Tag: working

Arguments Steal Mind Power

Arguments steal mind power. Have you ever noticed that arguments are rarely “won?” Even if you think you won an argument, what did you win?

If there really is a loser, he at least learned something, right? What did you get? Ego satisfaction, debating practice, and diminished mind power.

Arguing Diminishes Mind Power

There are times when things need to be debated, but most of the time, it really isn’t productive.

Do you want to argue the point? What do you get from a useless debate, and more importantly, what do you lose?

One thing is certain. A person listening to arguments can learn something from both sides, but what about the participants?

If your opponent makes a really good point, do you say, “Hey, you’re right!” or do you more often just look for a better argument?

Arguing too much gets you in the habit of looking for arguments more than for truth. You also get deeper into your thinking ruts the more you defend a position.

In a rut and ignoring the truth? If that doesn’t sound like it’s good for mind power, it’s because it isn’t.

Mind Power From Listening

If you say the moon is closer, and I say the sun is, one of us has to be right. If you say nurture is more important, and I say nature is, we’re both right.

The first argument has clearly defined terms. This isn’t common, and even here, what’s the point of arguing?

In the second example, our arguments have to do with values and experiences. We’ve seen different things in life, and we could spend a lifetime defining “important,” or I could shut up and listen.

My mind becomes more powerful with the addition of your ideas and knowledge. Listening is the better way.

To break the habit of arguing, purposely ask for peoples opinions, and listen without saying anything. You can ask them to clarify, but don’t offer one contrary idea.

Do this enough, and your learning will surprise you. The simple technique can be difficult, but it works.

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Working And Living Are Two Different Things (Part 2 of 2)

Do not dare to miss to first part.

 

Continuation:

When someone asks you to take an hour out of work to do something during the day, tell them that you’ll have to make that hour up at the end of the day, so they shouldn’t expect you out of the office until an hour later than usual.

Don’t Do Chores.

It can be tempting to do laundry or dishes when there’s a load of them to do and work seems slow. But don’t give it to it during your working day. Chores eat up an amazing amount of time.

Resist the temptation by wearing better clothes than you usually would when you’re working. Not a suit, but something business-casual that you wouldn’t really be willing to wash dishes in.

Have a Business Phone Line.

You need a phone line that’s just for business to let clients leave messages when you’re not in the office. Say exactly that in the message: ‘I’m not in the office right now, but please leave your name and number and I’ll get back to you’.

Whatever you do, don’t be tempted to take business calls after-hours. Nor give out your personal number to business contacts.

This is a sure-fire way to never stop working. Turn off the ringer on your business phone when you leave the office for the day.

With Children, All Bets are Off.

If you have children at home during the day, it can be very difficult to maintain a sensible work pattern. They will come and bother you at every opportunity, because they miss you and want to see you.

They’ll even cause trouble just to get you to sort it out. They wanted to come and bother you at your office job too, but they had no way of getting there.

So what can you do when there are children in the house? After all, it’s harsh to just ignore them, isn’t it?

The best answer I’ve found is to hire a babysitter, who can keep the kids entertained while you work. It could get expensive, but it shouldn’t be for long, right?

 

— end —

Working And Living Are Two Different Things (Part 1 of 2)

When you’re at home all the time, people have a way of giving you everything to do, with no regard for your job. It can be very hard indeed to keep your family life separate from your business when you work at home.

In fact, this is one of the most common reasons home businesses fail. Their owners come away all too glad to get back to the corporate grindstone.

Don’t be driven away from home business, here’s what you need to do to keep your family at bay:

Work Time, Home Time.

Make a schedule for when you’re going to work and when you’re not, and stick to it. This doesn’t have to be inflexible. It’s very silly to only work nine to five every day. But it still really needs to be there.

Without a plan, you’re inevitably going to go too far one way or the other. Either work far too much or nowhere near enough. You might find it best to a new plan at the start of each month or week, so that you can still respond to changes in circumstances.

Yes, I know it can be difficult to draw clear lines between family time and work time. Especially if your family is around for some of the hours that you want to be working. The only thing I can say to you is that it’s important to keep on trying.

The moment you give up everything’s going to come crashing down. Whatever you do, don’t let your family anywhere near your office space.

Fit Errands Around Work.

People will obviously be upset if you absolutely refuse to run their errands. Is it really so much trouble to run down to the bank when you’re at home all day? But you can’t let them take away hours from work. You should make your response automatic.

 

(TO BE CONTINUED)

LIFE WELL-LIVED

 

I will not forget her smile, so sweet and can be tasted from the air, upon seeing us arriving at her doorsteps. Puzzled, she ask, “So how are you guys doing?”, as she kisses and embraces my mom.

We brought some rice cake, corn pudding and roasted chicken, which are all comfort food of my grandmom.

There is no occasion, we just decide to pay her a surprise visit in her house as my mom misses her.

At a glance, you will notice how difficult for her to stand up and walk and move, due to age and some health conditions, but the same glance it is obvious how strong the woman is.

Way back when my siblings and I were growing up, my parents used to bring us to our grandmom’s residence in Manila or in her Fruit Store in GSIS office. I remember one time when we eat up all the available bananas in her fruit stand, and instead of getting angry, grandmom disciplined us with a sweet smile.

All her life, she is working hard to support some of her children and her grandchildren. A lot of times, she is too busy doing things for a living and she almost always forget to have a life.

Sometimes, we would invite her over for an out-of-town family get away to relax and have fun.

She is a real champion of hard-work, and it never fails her.

We can also enjoy our work. King Solomon advised “Whatever your hand finds to do, do it with all your strength, for there is no work, nor device, nor knowledge, nor wisdom, in the grave, where we will go” (vv. 10)”. Whatever our job or role in life, we can still do things that matter, and do them very well. We can encourage people, pray, and express love each day.

The Wise King also told us, “Time and chance happen to them all… No one knows when our lives on earth will end, but gladness and purpose can be found in this day by relying on God’s strength and depending on Jesus’ promise of eternal life (John 6:47)

Grandmom Ofelia reminds me to live each day well. Death is a reminder of life, and life is a gift. King Solomon said, “Anyone who is among the living has hope (Ecclesiastes 9:4). Life on Earth gives us the chance to influence and enjoy the world around us. We can eat and drink happily and relish our relationships” (vv. 7, 9).

To my grandmom, who is now goes back to her Creator, we would like to thank you for the opportunity you gave us to live, for all the lessons you taught, and for the unconditional love you brought. We will surely MISS BEING WITH YOU.

HARD-WORK (JOHN GOKONGWEI JR.’S AD CONGRESS SPEECH, EDITED, PART 2 OF 10)’

 

Please don’t missed out the first part, The Irreplaceable Lost

 

Continuation:

 

My mother sent my siblings to China where living standards were lower. She and I stayed in Cebu to work, and we sent them money regularly. My mother sold her jewelry. When that ran out, we sold roasted peanuts in the backyard of our much-smaller home. When that wasn’t enough, I opened a small stall in a WET MARKET. I chose one among several wet market a few miles outside the city because there were fewer goods available for the people there. I woke up at five o’clock every morning for the long bicycle ride to the wet market with my basket of goods.

There, I set up a table about three feet by two feet in size. I laid out my goods-soap, candles, and thread-and kept selling until everything was bought. Why these goods? Because these were hard times and this was a poor village, so people wanted and needed the basics-soap to keep them clean, candles to light the night, and thread to sew their clothes.

I was surrounded by other vendors, all of them much older. Many of them could be my grandparents. And they knew the ways of the wet market far more than a boy of 15, especially one who had never worked before.

But being young had its advantages. I did not tire as easily, and I moved more quickly. I was also more aggressive. After each day, I would make about 20 pesos in profit! There was enough to feed my siblings and still enough to pour back into the business. The pesos I made in the wet market were the pesos that went into building the business I have today.

After this experience, I told myself, “If I can compete with people so much older than me, if I can support my whole family at 15, I can do anything!”

Looking back, I wonder, what would have happened if my father had not left my family with nothing? Would I have become the man I am? Who knows?

The important thing to know is that life will always deal us a few bad cards. But we have to play those cards the best we can. And WE can play to win!

This was one lesson I picked up when I was a teenager. It has been my guiding principle ever since. And I have had 66 years to practice self-determination. When I wanted something, the best person to depend on was myself.

 

Continue reading:

OPPORTUNITY (PART 3 OF 10)

GROWING (PART 4 OF 10)

PERSEVERANCE (PART 5 OF 10)

DETERMINATION (PART 6 OF 10)

INNOVATION (PART 7 OF 10)

REAL PROMISING (PART 8 OF 10)

ASPIRATION (PART 9 OF 10)

LOOKING BACK (PART 10 OF 10)