Tag: therapy

Meditation: A Path To Inner Peace (Part 1 of 4)

A path to inner peace

Throughout history, meditation has been an integral part of many cultures. Records indicate that meditation was practiced in ancient Greece and India more than 5,000 years ago.

In the Buddhist religion, meditation is an important part of their spiritual practice. Different forms of meditation also practice in China and Japan, and Christianity, Judaism, and Islam have traditions similar to meditation.

The word meditation comes from the Latin ‘meditari’ which means: exercise, turn something over in one’s mind, think, consider. Its definition is “consciously directing your attention to alter your state of mind.”

The alternative therapy

Meditation is one of the proven alternative therapies that in recent years have been classified under the mind-body medicine therapies.

It is continuing to gain popularity, as more and more health experts believe that there is more to the connection between mind and body than modern medicine can explain.

Meditation aids the immune system and improve brain activity, according to researchers.

More and more doctors are prescribing meditation as a way to lower blood pressure, improve exercise performance, for people with angina, to help people with asthma to breathe easier, to relieve insomnia, and generally relax everyday stresses of life.

Many hospitals now offer meditation classes for their patients because of the health benefits. All promote physiological health and well-being.

For spiritual growth, now for managing stress

Traditionally, meditation is use for spiritual growth. Recently, it become a valuable tool for managing stress and finding a place of peace, relaxation, and tranquility in a demanding fast-paced world.

Benefits resulting from meditation include: physical and emotional healing; easing stress, fear, and grief; improved breathing; developing intuition; deep relaxation; exploring higher realities; finding inner guidance; unlocking creativity; manifesting change; emotional cleansing and balancing; and deepening concentration and insight.

A.K.A (also known as)

Meditation elicits many descriptive terms: stillness, silence, tranquility, peace, quiet, and calm. All counter stress and tension.

 

Continue reading:

Meditation: A Path To Inner Peace (Part 2 of 4)

Meditation: A Path To Inner Peace (Part 3 of 4)

Meditation: A Path To Inner Peace (Part 4 of 4)

Advertisements

Healing Abandonment & Abuse through Awareness (Part 1 of 2)

 

Many people I work with in therapy or in my writing-as-healing classes discover stories that surprise them—stories about the mistakes they felt their parents made, power imbalances in the family, or stories about physical or sexual abuse.

The darker stories are often a surprise. When writers sat down to write, those issues were not directly on their minds, but deep, revealing stories erupted from the pen. Though they were unexpected, for some they were a relief.

People who have been in therapy have had the same kind of experience—the subject matter in the forefront of the mind is not the material that “accidentally” arises during the session.

The therapy session begins with a particular subject in the present—for example dissatisfaction at work or trouble in a relationship, but often travels back in time with associations to parents, school, or past relationships.

It has become a cliché to talk about “dysfunctional” relationships and families, but most people do not have perfect families, and many have had to struggle with a range of problems—alcoholism, abuse—physical, sexual, or emotional, eating disorders, and depression, to name a few.

No one likes to be reminded of the past but when it keeps coming up, we are pushed to learn new responses as we search for more peace and positivism in our lives.

 

The past is not dead—it’s not even past.

-William Faulkner

Different kinds of abandonment

For people who have been abandoned, either literally by actual physical absence, or emotionally. A parent can be in the home and not there for us. The abandoned child syndrome may remain years later, showing up through insecurities and fears. Clinging behaviors or its opposite—walls to intimacy.

The abandoned child inside the adult can create havoc such as alcohol abuse, repeating their own abandonment by abandoning children, or refusal to have children out of fear of repetition. Depression, lack of energy and creativity, anger, and trying to fill up the emptiness may be manifestations of these issues.

 

Continue reading the last part.