Tag: success

The Mind-Set of a Leader

 

Words of wisdom from Mr Jack Welch:

 

Understanding that becoming a leader means we will actually have to change how we act. Too often than not, people who are promoted to their leadership position miss that very point… and the failure to do so probably trips up careers more than any other reason.

The fact is, being a leader changes everything.

Before we are a leader, success is all about growing ourselves. Our individual contributions, it is about us raising our hand and us getting called on and us delivering the right answer.

When we become a leader, success is all about growing others. It’s about making the people who work for us smarter, bigger, and bolder. Nothing we do anymore as an individual matters, except how we nurture and support our team and help our members increase their self-confidence. We will get our share of attention from above, but only in as much as our team wins. To describe the other way around, our success as a leader will come not from what we do every day, but from the reflected glory of our team’s performance.

From the ranks, promoted to be a team leader, is a big transition. It’s hard. No doubt about that. Being a leader basically requires a whole new mind-set, one that is constantly not thinking “How can I stand-out”? But is thinking “How can I help my people do their jobs better”?

Sometimes that mind-set requires undoing a couple of decades of momentum. After all, we may have probably spent our entire life, starting in in grade school and continuing through our last job, as an individual contributor, excelling at “raising our hand.”

But the good news is, we were probably promoted because someone above in the organization believes we have the stuff to make the leap from star player to a successful coach.

That leap actually involve actively mentoring people. Giving feedback at every opportunity, not just annual or semi-annual. We should talk to our people about their performance after meetings, presentations, or visits to clients. Make every significant event a teaching moment, discussing with them what we like about what they are and doing ways they can improve. There is no need to sugarcoat our exchanges, use a total candor which happens incidentally to be one of the defining characteristics of effective leaders.

Getting into the skin of our people is another way of growing others. Exude positive energy about life and the work that we are doing together, show optimism about our future, and care. Care passionately about each person’s performance and progress. Our energy will energize those around us.

Being a leader, it’s not about us anymore. It’s about them.

 

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Toyota – More of a State-of-Mind than an Auto Maker

 

Toyota first caught the world’s attention in the 1980s, when it became clear that there was something special about Japanese quality and efficiency.

Japanese cars were lasting longer than American cars and required much less repair. By the 1990s it became apparent that there was something more special about Toyota compared to other automakers in Japan.

It was not eye-popping car designs or performance, though ride was smooth and the designs often very refined. Rather, it was the way Toyota engineered and manufactured the autos that led to unbelievable consistency in the process of the product.

Toyota designed autos faster, with more reliability, yet at competitive cost, even when paying the relatively high wages of Japanese workers.

Equally impressive was that every time Toyota showed an apparent weakness and seemed vulnerable to the competition, Toyota miraculously fixed the problem and came back even stronger.

Today Toyota is the third-largest auto maker in the world, behind Volkswagen and Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi Alliance. However, Toyota is more profitable than any other auto makers.

Much of Toyota’s success comes from its astounding quality reputation. Consumers know that they can count on their Toyota vehicle to work right the first time and keep on working, while most U.S and European auto companies produce vehicles that may work when new but almost certainly will spend time in the shop in a year or so.

What is the secret of Toyota’s success? The incredible consistency of Toyota’s performance is a direct result of operational excellence, its strategic weapon.

This operational excellence is based in part of tools and quality improvement methods made famous by Toyota in the manufacturing world, such as just-in-time, kaizen, one-piece flow, jidoka and heijunka. These techniques helped spawned the “lean manufacturing” revolution. But tools and techniques are no secret weapon for transforming the business. It is their continued success at implementing these tools stems from a deeper business philosophy based on its understanding of people and human innovation.

Its success is ultimately based on its ability to cultivate leadership, teams, and culture, and to devise strategy, to build supplier relationships and to maintain a learning organization.

Make Friends with Failure

 

There’s no gainsaying that success brings happiness and satisfaction. It’s the fulfillment of a goal for putting in the best of your efforts and time. As each second and minute passes by, all you can think of is how to fulfill that goal. Each step taking in the right direction is a milestone, and a step gone wrong can have devastating consequences, and possibly lead to failure.

 

The sense of achievement and joy attained on reaching a goal is unparalleled. However, success without failure is not possible. A successful man can only lay a firm foundation using bricks that were thrown at him.
Even the minutest of our daily task involves success and failure. Take for instance, getting to your place of work on time, in spite of obstacles, is a goal in itself. Though achieving this goal may be a small success, but it is significant enough to get your day started in the right direction. When you fail to achieve this small target, taunts and insults set in. This tends to have a domino effect on all the activities of the day.

 

It is important to note that each step in life, regardless of how small, is important. So also is success and failure. Wondering how failure is important? The truth about failure is that it makes you stronger; it gives you inspiration (and remember, inspiration is always better than motivation!), strength and ultimately, helps you to LEARN.