cemetery where the dead dwells

Death Changes Perspective of Living

A change in perspective

We live and we die

We live and we die. But while living, most of us don’t keep the thought of death in mind. A person suffering from an incurable disease may keep it in his/her mind, but not a normal person suffering from ordinary ailments.

For a very big population on the earth, life is perpetual. That is how they think and live. Is this a right attitude? To a certain extent this is a right attitude and at times, wrong. Let us analyze further.

We not only live our life thinking that we will not die, but we also behave with others as if they will also not die.

A story

Let me give you an example. Let us talk about a friend. He/she does something or speaks something. We are deeply hurt and feel bad, and we begin blaming the other person for many things.

We don’t think of forgiving and carrying on. Why? Suppose that friend of ours meets his/her death after a week. What will be our reaction? We will go in a remorseful mood and blame ourselves.

The bad feelings that we had for that person loses all the meaning. That person is no more and no critical analysis or one-upmanship will help now. The situation has changed totally.

Accidents occur everyday

Anyone of us may die at any moment. No one knows about the time of his/her death. We all believe that we will live to a ripe old age and will die only after that. Sometimes, we don’t even think of that.

How about changing our perspective? How about keeping the thought in our mind at all times that – the person I am hating so much now, or I am arguing with so much now, may even die after an hour by meeting with some freak accident.

This may change our perspective about all our relationships. Is this not true? It will change our thoughts about ourselves also. We will all begin thinking more of today and worry less about tomorrow.

Life is precious

Every life is very precious. Every heart is precious. Why hurt anyone including your own self? Forgive everyone. Begin with yourself. Let death change our perspective.

 

— end —

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monkey eating apple and do not let go

The Importance Of Letting Go

Letting Go

The story of a monkey

There once was a happy monkey. He wandered through the jungle, happy to be alive. He stopped to eat delicious fruit when he was hungry, and resting when he was tired.

One day he came upon a house, where he saw a bowl of the most beautiful apples. He took one in each hand and ran back into the forest. Then sniffed the apples and smelled nothing.

He tried to eat them, but hurt his teeth. They were made of wood. They appeared beautiful, however, and when the other monkeys saw them, he held onto them even tighter.

He held his new wooden apples proudly as he wandered the jungle. They glistened red in the sun, and seemed perfect to him. He payed so much attention to them, that he didn’t even notice his growing hunger.

A fruit tree reminded him. He squeezed the apples in his hands, and couldn’t bear to let go of them in order to reach for the real fruit.

In fact, he couldn’t relax, either, if he was to defend his apples. A proud, but hungry and less happy monkey continued to walk along the forest trails.

The wooden apples became heavier, and the poor little monkey began to think about leaving them behind. He was tired, hungry, and he couldn’t climb trees or collect fruit with his hands full. What if he just let go?

Letting go seemed crazy

Letting go seemed crazy, but what else could he do? He was so tired. Seeing the next fruit tree, and smelling it’s fruit was enough. He dropped the wooden apples, reached up for his meal, and was happy again.

Letting Go Of Wooden Apples

Like that little monkey, we sometimes carry things that seem too valuable to let go. A man carries an image of himself as “productive” – carries it like a shiny wooden apple.

But in reality, his busyness leaves him tired, and hungry for a better life. Still, letting go seems crazy. Even his worries are sacred apples – they prove he’s “doing everything he can.” He holds onto them compulsively.

This is a hard thing to see. We identify so strongly with our things even, feeling pain when our cars got dents.

How much more powerfully do we identify with our beliefs and self-ideas? Yet they don’t always feed our souls, do they? And we become tired of defending them.

How else could the story end? The monkey might be found dead of hunger, under a beautiful tree, with fruit within reach, but still grasping his wooden apples.

I chose to end it with him letting go, because only with open hands can we receive.

old parchment with a message

An Old Message For A New Age (Part 1 of 3)

The seeker

This is an old message for a new age.  Do you consider yourself a seeker? I have a feeling if you’re reading this article, you do.

Definition of a seeker

If so, how exactly do you define it? What does it mean to you to be a “seeker?”

For me, the definition is constantly in process of clarifying itself. Shifting in and out of focus as I ask, “What is it that I’m seeking?”

Seek

There have been times – days, weeks, months, dare I say years – that it felt like wandering. Lost and lonely, in search of a nameless, faceless something that seemed forever before me.

But like a mirage, moving farther away the closer I drew. I could not grasp it. But I knew that when found it would make all the pieces of my life click together.

Instant happiness and abundance, perfect peace and love. Most of all, everything would finally make sense. I’d know my purpose; I’ll be brave enough to live it; I’d have no question that I couldn’t readily answer.

I can tell you, after so much time in the desert, I have found no such something. But that doesn’t mean the journey has not been fruitful.

In its finest moments the search has been a pilgrimage. One with the hue of holiness. And in those rare instances I know clearly what it is I seek. I’d like to share a story.

A story

Several years ago my mentor’s company sponsored a celebrity golf tournament. We attended, and I surprised myself at how star-struck I was! Especially since the stars were sports figures with whom I was barely familiar.

Of all of them, the kindest was David Robinson of the San Antonio Spurs. Walking next to him, my head came only to his chest, but I find him to be a gentle giant.

Late in the day I, along with many others, asked for his autograph. When he gave me back the piece of paper it had on it his name and “Matthew 6:33.” I overheard someone explain that he always places a verse from the Bible on his autographs. A different one for each person.

 

Continue reading the message:

An Old Message For A New Age (Part 2 of 3)

An Old Message For A New Age (Part 3 of 3)

a jockey, trusting himself, is ahead of the race

Learning To Trust Yourself (Part 2 of 3)

Please read the previous article:

Learning To Trust Yourself (Part 1 of 3)

 

Continuation:

 

When we make decisions, there are times the red flags are there, and we ignore them

A real story of one of my childhood girl friends

All the warning signs were there before she married her ex-husband. She can distinctly remember feeling extremely apprehensive the morning of their wedding. She even called me in tears because of something the ex-husband had said to her that morning.

Despite the negative character qualities, she went through with the marriage. She convinced herself that it was the right choice for their little boy, who was only one then. Within one year, they we were separated.

Other times we truly make the best decision we can

Ask any successful entrepreneur about her process of decision making. He will probably tell you he weighed all the pros and cons and tried to anticipate any problems.

He might have looked to the experts for helpful insight. In the end, he made the most informed decision he could. If you ask him if all his decisions were the right ones, he will tell you no.

Life changes; people change. Just because something doesn’t work out the way you wanted does not mean you cannot trust yourself in the future.

Trusting yourself is essential to loving yourself

You know yourself better than anyone and no one is going to take care of you except you. Until you trust yourself, you will not be able to fully trust anyone.

This is again a story of another good childhood girl friend of mine:

For a very long time, every morning her husband would come downstairs before leaving for work. Then he will ask my friend how his hair looked. She (my friend) would tell him it looked fine.

He would go to work and other people would tell him his hair looked good. However, other people or his wife (my friend) could do nothing to convince him that his hair was okay.

He would even say to her, “I don’t know if I can believe people when they say my hair looks good”.

His distrust to anyone is due to his distrust to himself. He was not comfortable with his hair, so he assumed everyone else felt the same way as him.

 

Continue reading:

Learning To Trust Yourself (Part 3 of 3)

Conquering Your Fears (Part 1 of 3)

Conquering your fears. Can you? Have you ever had a fear that kept you from living life fully? Perhaps this fear has stopped you from having MORE fun or experiencing GREATER success. Yes? You’re not alone. I have too.

Let me tell you a story from a great friend:

Fear that stops enjoying life to the fullest

The fear I conquered in the story below may not be my biggest fear. But with a little reflection I saw how it really stopped me from enjoying my family and life to the fullest.

It also taught me a valuable lesson of how taking steps to overcome my fear resulted in increased self confidence.

At the end of my story, I’ll give you tips for conquering your own fears.

Not the biggest fear

A few weekends ago my husband and I took our daughter Kasie, and my nephew Zach, to a water park. We all love the water and were having a blast until my hubby and the kids took off for. Those are the water slides.

As they enthusiastically ran to the slides I slowed way down. In fact, I stopped, found a chair and proceeded to organize our belongings.

As I settled into a lawn chair I saw Kasie and Zach whoosh down their side-by-side slides and plunge, feet first, into the cool water. They quickly resurfaced, sputtering and laughing and ready for more.

As Zach jumped out of the pool to run back up the stairs he looked at me laughing. Then he said, “Cari’s being a wimp.” He was right. I was.

You see, even though I love the water I’ve always been afraid of — water slides.

Time has come to make a choice

On this particular day however, the kid pressure was too great. I decided it was the time and place to conquer my old fear. As I hurried to the steps my chest tightened and my breathing became very shallow.

Each step I took to reach the top of the slide made me feel anxious, awkward and scared to death.

 

Continue reading Part 2 and Last Part.