Change (Part 2 of 2)

Do not miss the first part. Read it here.

 

Continuation:

 

The final and most rewarding possibility are the people who understand that change is a part of everything.

When we stop evolving, we start eroding. These people welcome change, in fact, they frequently generate it. They realize that change is what makes things happen.

Change propels us forward. These people are quick to make the necessary adaptations and suffer the least from the inevitable.

Questions to self

Do you recognize your own character in any of the above descriptions? Have you read Spencer Johnson’s book, Who Moved My Cheese? This book is an excellent description of the four possible characters in the Change Game.

In the book, the first character was a little person named Hem. Hem was afraid of change and believed it would make things worse. He avoided it at all costs.

The second character was a mouse named, Scurry. Scurry ran around in circles, just attempting to do something, anything. Sometimes he was right, sometimes wrong but he was constantly in motion.

The third character was a little person named Haw. Haw was slow to figure things out but eventually he adapted to the change and realized that the change could bring something better.

However, the real winner was the mouse, Sniff. Sniff jumped into action early, sniffing out the terrain and making a choice on what to do next. He adapted the quickest.

Which character are you? Who would you like to be? What would you have to give up to be the character you really want to be? Would you like to make a plan right now to implement these changes into your life? It will require a commitment and a good plan.

All of us needs a coach

This is where a coach can be helpful. When you identify an area in your life that requires some attention and you commit to making the necessary adjustments, it’s strange how life gets in the way sometime and we revert back to our previous ways.

A coach is someone who can keep you on track and pointed in the direction of your goals. A coach will support your progress and hold you accountable for the goals you set.

 

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Questions To Help You Find Your Life’s Purpose (Part 2 of 2)

Please read the first part.

 

Continuation:

 

Colleagues and acquaintances

  1. Who would I most like to work with?
  2. What would my perfect day be like?

Spiritual

  1. Is there a spiritual side to me, waiting to be unleashed?
  2. What would I like to do, RIGHT NOW, which would bring me the most happiness or pleasure?
  3. Which special gift do I have that I could give to the world?
  4. What makes me cry with joy, or brings tears to my eyes?

Hypothetical

  1. What would I like to do this weekend, just for fun?
  2. If I could be granted the power to change the world, what would I do?
  3. If I were given three wishes, what would they be?

Emotions

  1. What is something that scares me a bit, but would be really exciting if I did it?
  2. What does my heart say I am to do with my life?

Pride

  1. Which qualities do I possess that I am really proud of?
  2. What have I done in my life that I am really proud of?

Kindness

  1. If I had time available to contribute to a charity, or some cause, what would it be?
  2. What am I usually doing when I suddenly realize that time has flown by, and all my focus has been on that one task?

Travel and history

  1. What do I want to do on my next vacation?
  2. Who in history would I most love to be, and why?

Regrets and purpose

  1. What do I most regret not doing, so far in my life?
  2. At the end of my life, what would I most regret not having done?
  3. What is my life’s purpose?
  4. If I had to take a best guess at my life’s purpose, and just get started with something that excites me, what would it be?

Ponder these questions for a while. Pick out one that you can really relate to, and ask yourself the question over and over and over, until you have an answer.

The answers are within. If you ask, you will receive your answer.

You can live a life of purpose. You can live a life of passion and success! Ask, until you get your answer. And then take massive action. It’s worth it, I promise.

 

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Questions To Help You Find Your Life’s Purpose (Part 1 of 2)

Let’s get straight into it.

If you want to live a happy life, then you MUST spend some time deciding what you want to do with your life, and then make the effort to live that life with passion.

It’s up to you!

No-one else is going to do it for you.

So, take some time out from your busy day-to-day routine, and consider answering below:

List of questions

My life

  1. What is my life’s purpose?
  2. If I had to take a best guess at my life’s purpose, what would it be?
  3. Who am I?
  4. What is the most important thing in my life?
  5. What do I love to do, more than anything else?
  6. If I had only six months left to live, what would I like to achieve?
  7. What would I like to leave the world, as my legacy?
  8. What would I do with my life, if I knew I could not fail?

Activities

  1. If money, or time, or current responsibilities were not an issue, what would I like to do with my life, more than anything else in the world?
  2. What activities have I discovered that give me the most pleasure?
  3. What do I still want to learn?
  4. When I was a child, what did I dream of doing with my life?
  5. What has been the greatest challenge that I have overcome so far in my life? Could I help other people to overcome that same challenge?
  6. What challenge would I love to overcome, and then help others achieve the same?

Other people

  1. Who are the people I most admire?
  2. Why do I admire these people?
  3. How would I define their life’s purpose?
  4. What qualities do these people possess that I’d also like to be known for?

Dream

  1. What is the biggest dream I have ever had for my life?

Interests

  1. Which subjects did I enjoy most in school?
  2. What sport have I most enjoyed?
  3. Which art or craft have I most enjoyed?
  4. What social activity have I most enjoyed?
  5. What hobbies have I pursued?
  6. Which hobbies do I wish I had pursued?
  7. What would I like to do, if only other people didn’t think it was silly?

Where

  1. Where in the world would I most like to live?
  2. Who would I like to live there with?
  3. Where in the world would I like to work?

 

Continue reading the last part.

Tips To Discover Your Dream (Part 2 of 2)

Please read the first part.

 

Continuation:

 

Ask: “Who is this for?”

Do you want to live a dream to gain approval from others? Do you want to do it because YOU really want it for yourself? Your dream doesn’t need anyone else’s approval, it is all about YOUR life, not theirs.

Wanting approval for a dream poses a threat: What if others don’t approve? Do you make them happy or yourself happy? Have a dream because it is something you truly want to do; something that is important and gives meaning to your life because you deem it so.

Obviously, approval from others is nice. But if others don’t approve of the lifestyle you choose, then don’t let it make a difference to you

Have the courage to be yourself and live the life you deem appropriate and not the life others deem fit for you.

Your dream is something special

It should excite you, fill you with a burning passion and a determination to achieve it. If you’re lukewarm about it then chances are you won’t give it your best shot.

It should be something that you absolutely, definitely and positively HAVE to achieve. Failing to achieve it simply isn’t an option because it will make you seriously miserable and unhappy if you don’t get what you want.

It is vital that you have this commitment to your dream because a wishy-washy approach just won’t cut the mustard. Think. Plan. Write it all down. Set goals. Then take action each and every day to take you closer to your dream.

Time for me to sign off. Please don’t just read this article and then move on to something else. TAKE ACTION. Use the tips to help you identify what it is you want from life.

Remember the question:

“What, exactly, do you want to do with your life?”

Only you can provide the precise answers.

 

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Tips To Discover Your Dream (Part 1 of 2)

 

How to discover your dream. You know how? Let me ask a question. It is the most important question I can ask. I wonder if you could provide me with an answer within 10 seconds. Most people cannot.

Here it is:

What, exactly, do you want to do with your life?

A complete description of how you want to live your life including the most important goal you’d like to achieve. So answers like “make money”, “live in a big house”, or “meet someone special” have no place here.

Such vague, non-specific answers are given by most people. It is a sure sign that they haven’t identified what they really want to do with their lives.

The reason why it is so important to know the answer – in detail – to the question is because the answer reveals your dream.

Your dream is unique to you, and it represents something very important to your happiness and growth as a person. It is an expression of the real you and gives enormous meaning and purpose to your life.

So how do you know what your dream is? Many people say to me “If only I knew what I really wanted”.

If this applies to you, then here’s my top tips to identify your dream:

  1. Take the time to think seriously about what you want to do with your life. Ask yourself “How would I truly want to spend everyday if I could choose freely”. This is serious time and you should spend at least an hour everyday working out the answers to this question.
  2. On a sheet of paper, write down all the things you really enjoy doing and have a passion for. Write down all of the wonderful things you’d like to try too. For example, my list contains: working with computers, writing, motivating others to succeed, music, cooking, travel, history, the arts, farming.
  3. On another sheet of paper, write down all of the things you definitely DON’T want in your life. This is a great technique and brings clarity. For example, on my list, I have: No repetitive work, no bosses, no 9-5, no outdoor tasks, no relationships, no mysticism, no routines. Be honest with this. If you don’t like doing something, write it down. Duty has no role here; this is for you. If you don’t like doing something, write it down.

 

Continue reading the wonderful last part.