Tag: priorities

Ways To Prevent Procrastination Habit (Part 2 of 2)

Do not miss out the wonderful first part.

 

Continuation:

 

Over commitment

Saying “yes” to everything. This often leaves you feeling tired and without the energy to focus on what is most important to you. This leads to procrastination as projects and tasks are dropped.

Identify what is most important to you. Focus only on those areas which will make the biggest difference to your life. It will enhance your focus and motivation.

Set personal and professional goals

It’s hard to motivate yourself when you don’t have a good idea of what you want to accomplish. So when setting goals think about what you want to achieve in the short term and long term.

Techniques for doing so include the SMART strategy. S = specific M = measurable A= Action R = Realistic T = Time based. Use goal setting software to help you in goal planning and setting.

Prioritize Your Goals

Develop a plan or schedule to help you reach your goals. In doing so you will begin to identify whether some elements need to be included or enhanced or dropped completely.

Also remember to be flexible, revisit your goals regularly and modify or drop if appropriate. Just because a goal is written down doesn’t mean that it is set in stone!

Divide and conquer

Once you’ve prioritized your goals, divide them into smaller chunks. Sometimes we procrastinate because a project seems really large. It seemed that the scale of it overwhelms us and puts us into a temporary form of paralysis.

You don’t know where to start, so you don’t start at all! Approach each project – especially large ones – on a step by step basis.

Reward yourself

Once you start to complete tasks, reward yourself by giving yourself something that you want. So instead of seeing a film before you complete a task, see it afterwards and make it a reward for you.

Just get started

No excuses. Don’t wait until you’re “in the mood”. The mood never comes! It is a clever camouflage and a delaying tactic. What you resist persists!

Start with what is easiest, so that you experience immediate success. It will give you the fuel and motivation to upgrade and take on larger projects.

 

Do any of the above and you’ll be well on your way to Kicking the Procrastination Habit. And if you’re procrastinating over doing any of the above, then remember that life is the biggest deadline of all!

 

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Time User Or Time Waster? (Part 1 of 2)

48 hours a day

If you are like me, you’ve often wishes there were 48 hours in a day instead of just 24. There never seems to be enough time to get everything done that you want. Since we just have about 16 hours a day not counting sleep time, it’s important how we use the time we have.

On the average, people waste about 2 hours a day. This is mainly from poor planning. If a person is unorganized, they waste time trying to find things, they miss appointments, they only do one thing at a time when they could be doing two.

Work smart

Good time management is a major building block to success. Oftentimes, it’s not how much time we spend working but how efficiently we do the work. The key to successful time management is careful planning and setting priorities.

Plan your day, your week, and your month in advance. Know when things need to be done. A great way to “buy time” is to multi-task. Do more than one thing at a time. There are many things that do not require concentrated mental effort. It is possible to do things simultaneously.

 

“Failing to plan is planning to fail,”

– unknown

Simultaneously

Even though I am a big pro basketball fan, I can’t justify sitting down and spending three hours watching a game. I have to be doing other things while I do it. Thank goodness for instant replay! I find it a good time to spend icing injuries or some other busy work.

It is also possible to record the games and watch them while exercising. I exercise about 30 minutes a day so during the basketball season I can watch a game during the week without wasting any time doing it.

When you run errands try to do as many as you can on one trip. If you are self-employed, you can combine personal errands that are on the way to a business errand and have the mileage written off as a business expense.

 

Continue reading part 2

Bill Gates and The Guy Who Could Have Been Him (Part 10 of 10)

Appreciate more the story, read the previous post:

Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6Part 7, Part 8, and Part 9.

 

By the end of 1980s, Digital Research had entered a death spiral and Kildall wave the white flag of surrender. He approached Gates and asked him to consider buying Digital Research for a fair price of $26 million. Gates rejected the offer and told Kildall the company might be worth only $10 million. A humbled Kildall had to look elsewhere to find a savior for his declining company.

Kildall’s hubris may be the culprit. Having fathered a revolution in personal computing, he assumed that all the other players would continue their childlike dependency on him. He thought that a dominant thing would always be dominant. Kildall was blind to how the delayed release of CP/M-86 had pushed IBM, Microsoft,and Seattle Computer Products to their breaking points.

He couldn’t imagine that all three companies might work around him to steal CP/M’s market. The irony is that the people at all three companies would have preferred to help Kildall and CP/M-86 succeed. Instead, they were forced to go to the extreme lengths of launching a competitor to CP/M-86, solely because Kildall left them no choice.

Kildall’s more fundamental mistake, however is he didn’t follow where the money is like Bill Gates. Kildall ridiculed IBM’s clumsy technology and overlooked its enormous market power, probably because technical subjects interested Kildall and marketing strategy didn’t.

Meanwhile, Bill Gates sets his priorities in exact opposite order. He was willing to hand IBM a shoddy product derived from other people’s work because what mattered most to Gates was that the mighty IBM get its project done on time.

Kildall, the innovator, followed his passion for technical excellence and was shocked at that IBM wouldn’t follow him. Gates, the imitator, took his cues from IBM every step of the way, because he believed that following IBM was the smartest way to follow where the money is. Gates guessed right, and became one of the richest in the world.

 

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