Tag: patience

Money Will Not Take Away Your Fears And Anxieties

What money cannot buy

All the money in the world will not take away your fears and anxieties. You can be the most successful person in your business, however your money and success will do nothing in getting rid of your stresses and anxieties.

So what do you do to make your fears and anxieties to go away? Well, since money and fame are not the answers, then the best solution is to be smart in how you manage your fears.

Ways in how to manage your persistent fears and anxieties

Take it one day at a time. Instead of worrying about how you will get through the rest of the week or coming month, try to focus on today.

Each day can provide us with different opportunities to learn new things and that includes learning how to deal with your problems.

Focus on the present and stop trying to predict what may happen next week. Next week will take care of itself.

Learn how to manage your fearful thoughts that may be difficult to manage.

When experiencing a negative thought, read some positive statements and affirmations that help lift your spirits and make you feel better.

Remember that your fearful thoughts may be exaggerated so balance these thoughts with realistic thinking and common sense.

Take advantage of the help that is available around you. If possible, talk to a professional who can help you manage your fears and anxieties. They will be able to provide you with additional advice and insights on how to deal with your current problem.

Great help

It will be of great help in the long run, if a person is talking to a professional. He may be able to deal with their problems in the future. Managing your fears and anxieties takes practice. The more you practice, the better you will become.

When managing your fears and anxieties do not try to tackle everything at once. The best solution is to break your fears or problems into a series of smaller steps.

Completing these smaller tasks one at a time will make the stress more manageable and increases your chances of success.

Managing your fears and anxieties will take some hard work. Sooner or later, you will have to confront your fears and anxieties. Remember that all you can do is to do your best each day, hope for the best, and take things in stride.

Patience, persistence, education, and being committed in trying to solve your problem will go along way in fixing your problems.

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Developing Patience

Virtues of Patience

Webster’s defines be patient as bearing pains or trials calmly or without complaint, or being steadfast despite opposition, difficulty or adversity. I believe this why patience is called a virtue.

It is little practiced, but much needed. At the first sign of difficulty, many jump to an easier, smoother path, hoping to avoid the pain and suffering that is necessary on the road to personal growth.

But it is only by taking this rough road do we gain the experience necessary to develop our character. Impatience robs us of these types of life experiences. How would your world be different if you practiced more patience?

Patience is the ability to hang on when everyone else has given up. It is ability to release your need for immediate gratification and wait for the things to come in their own time frame.

Patience overcomes criticism and intolerance. It develops committed relationships in marriage, family, church, community and career.

Many a great leader have displayed patience by looking before they leaped, thinking before they acted, and considering before they decided. Indeed, it is the mark of maturity.

How Do We Develop More Patience?

First, realize that no one is perfect, including yourself. Accept yourself and others, imperfections and all. Everyone is struggling with their own set of fears, weaknesses, obstacles and crises.

We are all on the road of personal growth together and can help each other by showing more patience and kindness to each other.

Second, develop a consistent philosophy of life based upon a value system you believe in. Then when you are confronted with a situation, you can make your choice based upon the value system rather than an instant gratification response.

With every choice is a consequence. Do you act now and settle? Or do you wait to get the result you truly desire?

Third, change your perspective on the past, present and the future. Stop dwelling on your mistakes and failures. They cannot be changed. Instead, focus and what you can do now to make a difference.

Life is a blessing and each day should be lived as if it were your last. Start fresh everyday and remember the future comes one day at a time. What can you do today to change the results you have in the future?

Fourth, confront your fears rather than avoid them. Do the thing you fear the most and the fear will go away. “That which we persist in doing becomes easier to do, not that the nature of the thing has changed, but our ability to do it has increased.”

By doing more, it becomes easier, and when it becomes easier it becomes fun rather than stressful.

Finally, realize that all things come to those who wait. The Universe, the infinite force that connects us all, will bring the people who can help, the answers you may need, the tools and resources you are looking for when you need them.

Just be Patient

You must have faith and be patient and believe in your goals, realizing that they will often not be accomplished according to your original plans.

Circumstances change. People change. Things change. Let go of your anxiety, disbelief and doubt about achieving your goal. Know that The Universe is constantly supporting you and will always help you achieve the things you desire. Just be patient!

The Power Of Acceptance

 

Inevitably in life we will have to face disappointment from time to time. Sometimes they may be little disappointments, and other times they may be great, big, heart wrenching disappointments. When this happens to us, we have a choice in how we react. Some of us may give up on our dreams, others may keep fighting stubbornly against the tide, and still others may choose another path to travel.

One important aspect of dealing with disappointment is acceptance. When we keep fighting against our circumstances and disappointments, it can leave us feeling frustrated, bitter and exhausted. Especially during those times in life when everything seems to keep going wrong for us, we get more and more stressed as we try to resist the undesirable circumstances.

Practicing acceptance can help ease that inner tension and allow us to see our situation more clearly. Accepting your circumstances does not mean giving up! It does not mean that you have to be 100% happy with your current situation. Acceptance means that you acknowledge and accept where you are in your life at this moment, even though it may not be ideal.

Maybe you hate your job or your marriage is faltering. Maybe you are struggling to lose weight and can’t seem to get anywhere with it. Whatever it is that is causing you stress, try accepting it instead of fighting against it. Repeat the following to yourself: “I may not be thrilled with the way things are in my life right now, but I accept it. I will do what I can and give the rest to God. I am thankful for the blessings I do have right now, and I know that more are on the way.”

It may take a lot of patience at the beginning, but as you continue to do this, something amazing happens. The struggles suddenly don’t seem so large anymore. They won’t magically dissolve before your eyes, but the edges seem to soften a bit. Life doesn’t seem quite so harsh anymore. Solutions to the problems may even begin to appear. If that doesn’t happen right away, that’s okay! Know that they will eventually. Just keep practicing acceptance and have faith that things will turn around.

I believe that everything happens for a reason. We are where we are in our lives right now because we are meant to be here. Several factors may have contributed to our current circumstances, such as choices we made in the past, or outside influences we have no control over. The questions to ask yourself are: What is the lesson here? What do I need to learn about this situation? Though you may not be happy with your current situation, there IS a reason you are there right now.

This is especially true if you continuously find yourself in similar situations! For example, if you keep choosing unhealthy relationships, you might want to take some time to discover why. If you are always struggling financially, there may be a message for you there. If you can’t seem to figure it out on your own, you might consider seeking professional help. Sometimes an outside party can see things that we can’t.

No matter what difficulties you are struggling with right now, know that this too shall pass. Difficulties do not last forever. Oftentimes, struggles are opportunities in disguise..

Bill Gates and The Guy Who Could Have Been Him (Part 1 of 10)

 

Gary Kildall was a 30-year old Ph.D. in computer science at the Naval Postgraduate in Monterey, California.

In early 1972, he got a look at a new microchip produced by Intel Systems. The inch-long Intel 4004 had been designed to work inside a desktop calculating machine, but Kildall and a handful of his fellow technophiles saw the 4004 for what was the nucleus of a revolution in micro computing.

For the first time, the entire central processing unit of a computer had been contained within a single inexpensive microchip. A magazine once said that “Intel was selling a computer for $25”

With 2,300 transistors packed into a chip smaller than a human thumb, the Intel 4004 could theoretically power a computer compact enough to sit on a desktop. Immediately, Kildall set out to prove it could be done.

He worked nights and weekends on the project for more than a year, patiently developing hundreds of laborious workarounds to cope up with 4004’s limited memory. Kildall couldn’t afford to buy many of the computer components he needed to complete the task, so he bartered with Intel for hardware by trading some of the new software code he was writing.

At the time, Kildall had a wife and young son at home and was living on a $20,000-a-year teaching income. He probably should have had other priorities. But Kildall was one of those who gets a vision in his heart and feels compelled to make it real.

In 1973, he walked into the computer science department carrying a giant suitcase-sized box and plunked it down on his desk. It is heavy and ugly and didn’t do very much, but it was his very first personal computer. Kildall took it around the school, showing it off proudly to the amazement of hundreds of his fellow faculty and students. 

 

Continue reading Part 2Part 3Part 4, Part 5Part 6, Part 7Part 8, Part 9. and Part 10.