Tag: pain

Fear and Reason (Part 4 of 4)

Missed out the previous post? Read them here: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3.

 

Continuation:

When a belief or a hallucination refuses to permit you to hear the warning of nerves and muscles, nature will work disaster inevitably. Let us stand for the larger liberty.

It is joyously free to take advantage of everything nature may offer for true well-being. There is a partial liberty which tries to realize itself by denying various realities as real. There is a higher liberty which really realizes itself by conceding such realities as real. By using or disusing them as occasion may require in the interest of the self at its best.

True wisdom

  1. Take advantage of everything which evidently promises good to the self, without regard to this or that theory.
  2. Freely to use all things, material or immaterial, reasonable or spiritual.
  3. Embrace your science or your method
  4. Ignore your bondage to philosophy or to consistency.

So I say that to normal health the weary-sense is a rational command to replenish exhausted nerves and muscles.

Pain

It is not liberty, it is not healthful, to declare, “There is no pain!” Pain does exist, whatever you affirm, and your affirmation that it does not is proof that it does exist. For why and how declare the non-existence of that which actually is non-existent?

But if you say, “As a matter of fact I have pain, but I am earnestly striving to ignore it. To cultivate thought-health so that the cause of pain may be removed,” that is sane and beautiful.

This is the commendable attitude of the Bible character who cried: “Lord, I believe; help thou mine unbelief.”

To undertake swamping pain with a cloud of psychological fog is to turn anarchist against nature. By pain nature informs the individual that he is somewhere out of order. This warning is normal.

The feeling becomes abnormal in the mind when imagination twangs the nerves with reiterated irritation. It will confused by the discord and the psychic chaos, cowers and shivers with fear.

Fear does exists

I do not say there is no such thing as fear. Fear does exist. But it exists in your life by your permission only, not because it is needful as a warning against “evil.”

Fear is induced by unduly magnifying actual danger, or by conjuring up fictitious dangers through excessive and misdirected psychical reactions. This also may be taken as a signal of danger, but it is a falsely-intentioned witness.

It is not needed, and is hostile to the individual because it threatens self-control. It also absorbs life’s forces in useless and destructive work when they ought to be engaged in creating values.

 

— end —

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Forgiveness: A Path to Healing (Part 1 of 2)

 

In our journey to inner peace and healing, both guilt and forgiveness of self and others have a profound effect on this process.

Guilt is defined as a feeling of culpability especially for imagined offences or from a sense of inadequacy; a self-reproach; and forgiveness as the act of forgiving or the ceasing of feeling resentment against an offender.

Guilt and lack of forgiveness of self and others, burdens many people with the heavy weight of inappropriate shame and the destruction of deep-seated resentments.

In recent years, much has been written about the destructiveness of repressed emotions and particularly anger and resentment in contributing to life-threatening illnesses.

The belief that feeling emotion means we are weak is a dreadful legacy to burden people with. Teaching people that strength means not feeling or denying our feelings is tantamount to creating illness.

Beliefs such as “big boys don’t cry” and “good girls don’t get angry” has resulted in men and women who are unable to get in touch with what they actually feel. Depression is thought to be caused by anger turned inward and is only one of the symptoms of the need to protect ourselves from the scorn associated with expressing feelings.

Many other illnesses and particularly the addictions are theorized to be expressions of a deep level of emotional pain.

Why won’t we forgive? I believe it starts from our unwillingness to forgive ourselves.  We believe that we are undeserving of love, respect, acceptance, appreciation, and the right to live a life where we walk in peace, joy, harmony, and abundance.

Somewhere along the line, we started to believe that all the rules and regulations of the society in which we live defined who we were supposed to be.

We stopped trusting and believing in our own inherent worth and came to believe that we were “not good enough.” Messages such as “you failed” or “you should” became a litany for us to abuse ourselves with guilt.

 

Continue reading Part 2 here.

When God Seems Distant

 

God is real, no matter how you feel.

It is easy to worship God when things are going great in our lives. When He has provided food, friends, family, health and happy situations. But circumstances are not always pleasant. How do we worship God then? What do you do when God seemed a million miles away?

The deepest level of worship is praising God in spite of pain, thanking God during a trial, trusting him when tempted, surrendering while suffering, and loving him when he seems distant.

Friendships are often tested by separation and silence; you are divided by physical distance or you are unable to talk. In your friendship with God, you won’t always feel close to him. Philip Yancey has wisely noted, “Any relationship involves times of closeness and times of distance, and in relationship with God, no matter how intimate, the pendulum will swing from one side to the other.” That’s when worship gets difficult.

To mature our friendship, God will test it with periods of seeming separation – times when it feels as if he has abandoned or forgotten us. God feels a million miles away.

David probably had the closest friendship with God of anyone. God took pleasure in calling him “a man after my own heart.” Yet David frequently complained of God’s apparent absence. Of course God hadn’t really left David. He has promised “I will never leave you nor forsake you.” But God has not promised “you will always feel My presence.” In fact, God admits that sometimes He hides His face from us.

Yes, God wants us to sense His presence, but He is more concerned that we trust him than that we feel him. Faith, not feelings, pleases God.