Tag: loss

LIFE WELL-LIVED

 

I will not forget her smile, so sweet and can be tasted from the air, upon seeing us arriving at her doorsteps. Puzzled, she ask, “So how are you guys doing?”, as she kisses and embraces my mom.

We brought some rice cake, corn pudding and roasted chicken, which are all comfort food of my grandmom.

There is no occasion, we just decide to pay her a surprise visit in her house as my mom misses her.

At a glance, you will notice how difficult for her to stand up and walk and move, due to age and some health conditions, but the same glance it is obvious how strong the woman is.

Way back when my siblings and I were growing up, my parents used to bring us to our grandmom’s residence in Manila or in her Fruit Store in GSIS office. I remember one time when we eat up all the available bananas in her fruit stand, and instead of getting angry, grandmom disciplined us with a sweet smile.

All her life, she is working hard to support some of her children and her grandchildren. A lot of times, she is too busy doing things for a living and she almost always forget to have a life.

Sometimes, we would invite her over for an out-of-town family get away to relax and have fun.

She is a real champion of hard-work, and it never fails her.

We can also enjoy our work. King Solomon advised “Whatever your hand finds to do, do it with all your strength, for there is no work, nor device, nor knowledge, nor wisdom, in the grave, where we will go” (vv. 10)”. Whatever our job or role in life, we can still do things that matter, and do them very well. We can encourage people, pray, and express love each day.

The Wise King also told us, “Time and chance happen to them all… No one knows when our lives on earth will end, but gladness and purpose can be found in this day by relying on God’s strength and depending on Jesus’ promise of eternal life (John 6:47)

Grandmom Ofelia reminds me to live each day well. Death is a reminder of life, and life is a gift. King Solomon said, “Anyone who is among the living has hope (Ecclesiastes 9:4). Life on Earth gives us the chance to influence and enjoy the world around us. We can eat and drink happily and relish our relationships” (vv. 7, 9).

To my grandmom, who is now goes back to her Creator, we would like to thank you for the opportunity you gave us to live, for all the lessons you taught, and for the unconditional love you brought. We will surely MISS BEING WITH YOU.

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GROWING (JOHN GOKONGWEI JR.’S AD CONGRESS SPEECH, EDITED, PART 4 OF 10)

Don’t miss out Part IPart II, and Part III.

When my business grew, and it was time for me to bring in more people- my family, the professionals, the consultants, more employees- I knew that I had to be there to teach them what I knew. When dad died at age 34, he did not leave a succession plan. From that, I learned that one must teach people to take over a business at any time. The values of hard work that I learned from my father, I taught to my children. They started doing jobs here and there even when they were still in high school. Six years ago, I announced my retirement and handed the reins to my youngest brother James and only son Lance. But my children tease me because I still go to the office every day and make myself useful. I just hired my first Executive Assistant and moved into a bigger and nicer office.

Building a business to the size of JG Summit was not easy. Many challenges were thrown my way. I could have walked away from them, keeping the business small, but safe. Instead, I chose to fight. But this did not mean I won each time.

By 1976, at age 50, we had built significant businesses in food products anchored by a branded coffee called Blend 45, and agro- industrial products under the Robina Farms brand. That year, I faced one of my biggest challenges, and lost. And my loss was highly publicized, too. But I still believe that this was one of my defining moments.

In that decade, not many business opportunities were available due to the political and economic environment. Many Filipinos were already sending their money out of the country. As a Filipino, I felt that our money must be invested here. I decided to purchase shares in San Miguel, then one of the Philippines‘ biggest corporations. By 1976, I had acquired enough shares to sit on its board.

 

Continue reading Part V, Part VI, Part VII, Part VIII, Part IX, and last Part X

THE IRREPLACEABLE LOSS (JOHN GOKONGWEI JR.’S AD CONGRESS SPEECH, EDITED, PART 1 OF 10)

This blog is to inspire every one. A real story of rags to riches, of why failures are manifestations of  successes, of how hard-work changes life and of how a dream do come true.

This is the brief biography of John Gokongwei Jr. through his speech:

I would like to talk about my life, entrepreneurship, and globalization. I would like to talk about how we can become a great nation.

You may wonder how one is connected to the other, but I promise that, as there is truth in advertising, the connection will come.

Let me begin with a story I have told many times. My own.

I was born to a rich Chinese-Filipino family. I spent my childhood in Cebu (a City in the South where its economy is next to Manila) where my father owned a chain of movie houses, including the first air-conditioned one outside Manila. I was the eldest of six children and lived in a big house in Cebu’s Forbes Park.

A chauffeur drove me to school every day as I went to San Carlos University, then and still one of the country’s top schools. I topped my classes and had many friends. I would bring them to watch movies for free at my father’s movie houses.

When I was 13, my father died suddenly of complications due to typhoid. Everything I enjoyed vanished instantly. My father’s empire was built on credit. When he died, we lost everything – our big house, our cars, and our business to the banks.

I felt angry at the world for taking away my father, and for taking away all that I enjoyed before. When the free movies disappeared, I also LOST HALF OF MY FRIENDS. On the day I had to walk two miles to school for the very first time, I cried to my mother, a widow at 32. But she said: “You should feel lucky. Some people have no shoes to walk to school. What can you do? Your father died with 10 centavos in his pocket.”

So, what can I do? I WORKED.

 

Continue reading:

HARD-WORK (PART 2 OF 10)

OPPORTUNITY (PART 3 OF 10)

GROWING (PART 4 OF 10)

PERSEVERANCE (PART 5 OF 10)

DETERMINATION (PART 6 OF 10)

INNOVATION (PART 7 OF 10)

REAL PROMISING (PART 8 OF 10)

ASPIRATION (PART 9 OF 10)

LOOKING BACK (PART 10 OF 10)