Tag: lesson

Becoming A Student Of Life (Part 2 of 2)

Do not miss out the first part.

 

Continuation:

 

Keep an Open Heart

Express deep gratitude for your life, and all of the experiences you have – even the not so pleasant ones. Be willing to be vulnerable in your connections with others, and allow yourself to feel.

Too often we are afraid of our emotions and try to numb them or run away from them. Instead, let your emotions be your teachers. Listen to them, and honor them. They will teach you a lot about yourself.

Look for the Lesson

In every experience, ask yourself, “What can I learn from this?” Sometimes the lesson is obvious, and sometimes you’ll have to search for it. With every lesson, allow it to become a part of you and make you a better, stronger, happier person.

Though we all make mistakes and stumble, the goal is to make new mistakes. It is better than repeating the same ones over and over again. As long as we are making progress, we’re doing great! Use your own awareness to overcome challenges and keep moving forward.

Enjoy the Journey

Most of us take life so seriously! Yes, it does have its serious moments. Overall this is supposed to be a pleasant experience, and we can make it that way by simply choosing to.

Don’t worry so much about whether you’re making as much progress as you should. Don’t get frustrated when things don’t always work out as planned. Instead take a lighter attitude and understand that it’s all just a journey. The point is to relax and enjoy.

Imagine and focus

Imagine that you’re a beautiful white sponge, and you come across these brilliant pools of colored liquid. There’s a red pool of passion, a pink pool of love, a yellow pool of knowledge, a green pool of gratitude, and a purple pool of fun.

Go ahead and dip your sponge toe into each of these pools, and your color will begin to change. Rather than being a plain white sponge, you are now a beautiful, multi-colored sponge, filled with passion, love, knowledge, gratitude, and fun.

Unfortunately, there are also a few pools of black, brackish stuff like negative self-talk, fear, regrets, etc. If you accidentally absorb some of this and it begins to taint your colors, don’t worry about it too much.

Just focus on revisiting the pretty, colorful pools and absorbing more good stuff. It will dilute the negative stuff, and eventually get rid of it all together.

 

— end —

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Conquering Your Fears (Part 3 of 3)

Do not miss out reading the first and second part.

 

Continuation:

 

What’s your “water slide”? I bet you have one, or many. We all do. What fear, if you conquered it, would allow you to have a bit more fun, experience greater success, or live life a bit more fully?

Some fears feel bigger to conquer than others. My water slide fear may not seem like the biggest fear one can have.

Having it causes me to isolate myself from the rest of my family. It even keep me from having MORE fun, joy and exhilaration in my life.

The moral lesson

Conquering your fears, one by one, builds confidence and increases your quality of life. Don’t let your fears hold you back from living the life you wish you were living.

Tips For Conquering Your Fears

  1. Recognize a fear is present
  2. Declare you are going to conquer the fear
  3. Expect to feel anxious, awkward and scared
  4. Consider copying a style you like until you find your own style
  5. Focus your attention
  6. Motivate yourself with affirmations
  7. Step into the fear with abandon
  8. Let go and have fun!
  9. Remind yourself to keep breathing
  10. Pat yourself on the back when it’s over
  11. Notice how much easier it gets

When you have time, take a personal inventory of the fears keeping you from living the life you want. Then make a commitment and challenge yourself to face and conquer one them that’s been holding you back.

Use the tips above to guide your way. To get started, see if any from the list below fit you:

Common fears

  1. Admitting mistakes or wrong-doings
  2. Adventure
  3. Being inadequate/not good enough
  4. Doing something you’ve never done before
  5. Expressing yourself
  6. Failure
  7. Healing emotional wounds
  8. Health concerns
  9. Money/finances
  10. Never having enough
  11. Public speaking
  12. Promoting yourself
  13. Saying “NO”
  14. Sharing your feelings
  15. Taking a risk, such as starting a business or changing careers
  16. Traveling

 

— end —

HARD-WORK (JOHN GOKONGWEI JR.’S AD CONGRESS SPEECH, EDITED, PART 2 OF 10)’

 

Please don’t missed out the first part, The Irreplaceable Lost

 

Continuation:

 

My mother sent my siblings to China where living standards were lower. She and I stayed in Cebu to work, and we sent them money regularly. My mother sold her jewelry. When that ran out, we sold roasted peanuts in the backyard of our much-smaller home. When that wasn’t enough, I opened a small stall in a WET MARKET. I chose one among several wet market a few miles outside the city because there were fewer goods available for the people there. I woke up at five o’clock every morning for the long bicycle ride to the wet market with my basket of goods.

There, I set up a table about three feet by two feet in size. I laid out my goods-soap, candles, and thread-and kept selling until everything was bought. Why these goods? Because these were hard times and this was a poor village, so people wanted and needed the basics-soap to keep them clean, candles to light the night, and thread to sew their clothes.

I was surrounded by other vendors, all of them much older. Many of them could be my grandparents. And they knew the ways of the wet market far more than a boy of 15, especially one who had never worked before.

But being young had its advantages. I did not tire as easily, and I moved more quickly. I was also more aggressive. After each day, I would make about 20 pesos in profit! There was enough to feed my siblings and still enough to pour back into the business. The pesos I made in the wet market were the pesos that went into building the business I have today.

After this experience, I told myself, “If I can compete with people so much older than me, if I can support my whole family at 15, I can do anything!”

Looking back, I wonder, what would have happened if my father had not left my family with nothing? Would I have become the man I am? Who knows?

The important thing to know is that life will always deal us a few bad cards. But we have to play those cards the best we can. And WE can play to win!

This was one lesson I picked up when I was a teenager. It has been my guiding principle ever since. And I have had 66 years to practice self-determination. When I wanted something, the best person to depend on was myself.

 

Continue reading:

OPPORTUNITY (PART 3 OF 10)

GROWING (PART 4 OF 10)

PERSEVERANCE (PART 5 OF 10)

DETERMINATION (PART 6 OF 10)

INNOVATION (PART 7 OF 10)

REAL PROMISING (PART 8 OF 10)

ASPIRATION (PART 9 OF 10)

LOOKING BACK (PART 10 OF 10)