Tag: journey

An Old Message For A New Age (Part 1 of 3)

The seeker

This is an old message for a new age.  Do you consider yourself a seeker? I have a feeling if you’re reading this article, you do.

Definition of a seeker

If so, how exactly do you define it? What does it mean to you to be a “seeker?”

For me, the definition is constantly in process of clarifying itself. Shifting in and out of focus as I ask, “What is it that I’m seeking?”

Seek

There have been times – days, weeks, months, dare I say years – that it felt like wandering. Lost and lonely, in search of a nameless, faceless something that seemed forever before me.

But like a mirage, moving farther away the closer I drew. I could not grasp it. But I knew that when found it would make all the pieces of my life click together.

Instant happiness and abundance, perfect peace and love. Most of all, everything would finally make sense. I’d know my purpose; I’ll be brave enough to live it; I’d have no question that I couldn’t readily answer.

I can tell you, after so much time in the desert, I have found no such something. But that doesn’t mean the journey has not been fruitful.

In its finest moments the search has been a pilgrimage. One with the hue of holiness. And in those rare instances I know clearly what it is I seek. I’d like to share a story.

A story

Several years ago my mentor’s company sponsored a celebrity golf tournament. We attended, and I surprised myself at how star-struck I was! Especially since the stars were sports figures with whom I was barely familiar.

Of all of them, the kindest was David Robinson of the San Antonio Spurs. Walking next to him, my head came only to his chest, but I find him to be a gentle giant.

Late in the day I, along with many others, asked for his autograph. When he gave me back the piece of paper it had on it his name and “Matthew 6:33.” I overheard someone explain that he always places a verse from the Bible on his autographs. A different one for each person.

 

Continue reading the message:

An Old Message For A New Age (Part 2 of 3)

An Old Message For A New Age (Part 3 of 3)

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Change (Part 2 of 2)

Do not miss the first part. Read it here.

 

Continuation:

 

The final and most rewarding possibility are the people who understand that change is a part of everything.

When we stop evolving, we start eroding. These people welcome change, in fact, they frequently generate it. They realize that change is what makes things happen.

Change propels us forward. These people are quick to make the necessary adaptations and suffer the least from the inevitable.

Questions to self

Do you recognize your own character in any of the above descriptions? Have you read Spencer Johnson’s book, Who Moved My Cheese? This book is an excellent description of the four possible characters in the Change Game.

In the book, the first character was a little person named Hem. Hem was afraid of change and believed it would make things worse. He avoided it at all costs.

The second character was a mouse named, Scurry. Scurry ran around in circles, just attempting to do something, anything. Sometimes he was right, sometimes wrong but he was constantly in motion.

The third character was a little person named Haw. Haw was slow to figure things out but eventually he adapted to the change and realized that the change could bring something better.

However, the real winner was the mouse, Sniff. Sniff jumped into action early, sniffing out the terrain and making a choice on what to do next. He adapted the quickest.

Which character are you? Who would you like to be? What would you have to give up to be the character you really want to be? Would you like to make a plan right now to implement these changes into your life? It will require a commitment and a good plan.

All of us needs a coach

This is where a coach can be helpful. When you identify an area in your life that requires some attention and you commit to making the necessary adjustments, it’s strange how life gets in the way sometime and we revert back to our previous ways.

A coach is someone who can keep you on track and pointed in the direction of your goals. A coach will support your progress and hold you accountable for the goals you set.

 

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Change (Part 1 of 2)

The only thing that never change is change

Things never stay the same

One thing in life is certain—change. Things never stay the same. If you are hoping for the status quo, then I’m afraid you will be disappointed. Just think back to how things were five years ago and you will realize that there is so very much that’s already different in a very short time.

I’m sure there are some of you who know people who refused to adapt to the computer age. I still know some “old timers” who want to use word processors or even typewriters instead! Imagine. What is up with that?

Again, our choice

Well, when change comes we have several options, some of which are more adaptive than others. Let’s take a look at them.

The first option is to refuse to change or adapt to any new circumstances.

Just like the person who still uses a word processor. These are generally people who are afraid of change. I also think that underlying that fear is the fear of being inadequate.

When change requires new learning, as it often does, some people don’t think they will be able to master the new skills so it is easier to simply renounce the changes than adapt. The problem is that these are the people who are left in the dust.

The second possibility is the slow starter.

These people usually start out in one of the first two mentioned roles. Either refusing to change or anxiously running around trying to figure out what to do about it.

They do not like change any more than the next person and they resist and resist until one day, they realize that the change may actually bring benefits. Once they see that there is a payoff for them, they fairly easily do the necessary things to adapt to the change.

A third possibility is what we see in the over anxious people in our midst.

You know who they are. They are the ones who are always making mountains out of molehills. Those who have a nervous energy about them whenever confronted with a novel situation.

They imagine all the possible scenarios about what could occur and seem to just go around in circles. Those who don’t adapt to the change. They just worry themselves sick over it.

 

(TO BE CONTINUED)

Becoming A Student Of Life (Part 2 of 2)

Do not miss out the first part.

 

Continuation:

 

Keep an Open Heart

Express deep gratitude for your life, and all of the experiences you have – even the not so pleasant ones. Be willing to be vulnerable in your connections with others, and allow yourself to feel.

Too often we are afraid of our emotions and try to numb them or run away from them. Instead, let your emotions be your teachers. Listen to them, and honor them. They will teach you a lot about yourself.

Look for the Lesson

In every experience, ask yourself, “What can I learn from this?” Sometimes the lesson is obvious, and sometimes you’ll have to search for it. With every lesson, allow it to become a part of you and make you a better, stronger, happier person.

Though we all make mistakes and stumble, the goal is to make new mistakes. It is better than repeating the same ones over and over again. As long as we are making progress, we’re doing great! Use your own awareness to overcome challenges and keep moving forward.

Enjoy the Journey

Most of us take life so seriously! Yes, it does have its serious moments. Overall this is supposed to be a pleasant experience, and we can make it that way by simply choosing to.

Don’t worry so much about whether you’re making as much progress as you should. Don’t get frustrated when things don’t always work out as planned. Instead take a lighter attitude and understand that it’s all just a journey. The point is to relax and enjoy.

Imagine and focus

Imagine that you’re a beautiful white sponge, and you come across these brilliant pools of colored liquid. There’s a red pool of passion, a pink pool of love, a yellow pool of knowledge, a green pool of gratitude, and a purple pool of fun.

Go ahead and dip your sponge toe into each of these pools, and your color will begin to change. Rather than being a plain white sponge, you are now a beautiful, multi-colored sponge, filled with passion, love, knowledge, gratitude, and fun.

Unfortunately, there are also a few pools of black, brackish stuff like negative self-talk, fear, regrets, etc. If you accidentally absorb some of this and it begins to taint your colors, don’t worry about it too much.

Just focus on revisiting the pretty, colorful pools and absorbing more good stuff. It will dilute the negative stuff, and eventually get rid of it all together.

 

— end —

Spiritual Growth: The Spiritual Challenge of Modern Times (Part 2 of 2)

Do not miss the wonderful first part.

 

Continuation:

 

To grow spiritually is to search for meaning

Religions that believe in the existence of God such as Christianity, Judaism, and Islam suppose that the purpose of the human life is to serve the Creator of all things.

Several theories in psychology propose that we ultimately give meaning to our lives. Whether we believe that life’s meaning is pre-determined or self-directed, to grow in spirit is to realize that we do not merely exist.

We do not know the meaning of our lives at birth. We gain knowledge and wisdom from our interactions with people. Also from our actions and reactions to the situations we are in.

As we discover this meaning, there are certain beliefs and values that we reject and affirm. Our lives have purpose. This purpose puts all our physical, emotional, and intellectual potentials into use; sustains us during trying times; and gives us something to look forward to—a goal to achieve, a destination to reach.

A person without purpose or meaning is like a drifting ship at sea.

To grow spiritually is to recognize interconnections

Religions stress the concept of our relatedness to all creation, live and inanimate. Thus we call other people “brothers and sisters” even if there are no direct blood relations.

Moreover, deity-centered religions such as Christianity and Islam speak of the relationship between humans and a higher being. On the other hand, science expounds on our link to other living things through the evolution theory.

This relatedness is clearly seen in the concept of ecology, the interaction between living and non-living things. In psychology, connectedness is a characteristic of self-transcendence, the highest human need according to Maslow.

Recognizing your connection to all things makes you more humble and respectful of people, animals, plants, and things in nature. It makes you appreciate everything around you. This moves you to go beyond your comfort zone and reach out to other people. It become stewards of all other things around you.

 

Growth is a process thus to grow in spirit is a day-to-day encounter. We win some, we lose some, but the important thing is that we learn. From this knowledge, further spiritual growth is possible.

 

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