metal chroming process, an innovation

What Innovation Can Do to Your Life (Part 2 of 2)

Did you know what innovation can do to your life? Read the first article below:

What Innovation Can Do to Your Life (Part 1 of 2)

 

Continuation:

 

Find your own style

You can always tell a Van Gogh from a Matisse. You’ll know Hemingway wrote something by the choice of words on the paper. So it is the same with you.

People will appreciate your innovation more because it is uniquely yours and that no one else would have thought of what you were thinking. That will let people see how valuable an asset you are.

Don’t hide behind nifty gadgets or tools

You don’t need the most expensive set of paints to produce a masterpiece. The same way with writing. You don’t need some expensive fountain pen and really smooth paper for a bestseller.

In fact, J.K. Rowling wrote the first book of the Harry Potter Series on bits of tissue. So what if you’ve got an expensive SLR camera if you’re a crappy photographer?

Who cares if you’ve got a blinging laptop if you can’t write at all? The artist actually reduces the number of tools he has as he gets better at his craft: he knows what works and what doesn’t.

Nothing will work without passion

What wakes you up in the mornings? What keeps the flame burning? What’s the one thing that you’ll die if you don’t do? Sometimes people with talent are overtaken by the people who want it more.

Think the hare and the tortoise. Ellen Degeneres once said that if you’re not doing something that you want to do, then you don’t really want to do it. And that’s true.

Sometimes you just want something so bad you become a virtual unstoppable. And that is passion. Passion will keep you going.

Don’t worry about inspiration

You can’t force it; inspiration hits when you least expect it to, for those unpredictable yet inevitable moments you should prepare.

An idea could strike you on the subway, yet alas, you poor unfortunate soul; you have no sheet of paper to scribble down a thought that could change the world.

Avoid these disasters. Have a pen and paper within your arm’s reach at all times.

I hope this article has helped you bring more innovation into your life. Keep in mind that you’re doing these things for your own satisfaction and not anybody else’s.

But soon enough they will notice, and everything should snowball from there.

 

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Journey To The Top (Part 2 of 3)

Do not miss the wonderful first part.

 

Continuation:

Bosses appreciate people who can get things done. Think about it – your company seniors have goals to achieve, just like you. While plans need to be flexible, goals are fix. They would never like to have people who persistently fail to meet objectives assigned and people who have a habit of coming up with excuses instead of desired results.

Recently, during a short break in our workshop, I came across some people who were discussing when was the right time to move from one company to another. They were evaluating the pros and cons of job shifting every two years.

My suggestion to them was simple, “Consider moving only when you have made a visible, impactful & sustainable contribution to your existing workplace.”

It is not how long you stay that matters – it is eventually what you deliver – the legacy you leave behind. Your move must be seamless, with a successor in place, before you venture to newer and bigger things.

Let solutions motivate

It is pointless to complain that bosses are de-motivating. Go-getters are internally motivated. They don’t rely on the external motivators like appreciation or a pat on the back – although it feels good to hear a nice word now and then! Your greatest motivation is your achievement – the work you get done.

At the end of the day it revs up and adds spice to your resume and eventually your growth. Since the concept here is simulating the top, think and reflect who motivates your company/ organization/institution head.

Who motivates your CEO? It is a lonely position, where at times you cannot openly share your fears and concerns as it may have a negative impact on the team. CEOs are usually motivated by the corporate results their team delivers. See your current job as a business.

Be self-inspired and solution-oriented. ‘SOLO-U-TIONIST i.e. people who take responsibility for solutions are always in demand. I recently read a quote some where that said, I don’t like work… but I like what is in work — the chance to find yourself. Your own reality — for yourself, not for others — which no other man can ever know.

 

Continue reading the Last Part.

Bill Gates and The Guy Who Could Have Been Him (Part 4 of 10)

Do not miss out this great story, I recommend reading these first:

Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3

 

Gates and Kildall had a lot of common. Both hailed from the Seattle area. They had even bumped into each other at a Seattle computer center years when Kildall was still a graduate student at the University of Washington and Gates was a high school hacker sneaking some computer time.

Both loved talking about software code as much as they enjoyed writing it. They also shared a passion for driving dangerously fast. When they weren’t talking software, they swapped stories about speed traps, comparing the size of their most recent speeding tickets.

While they have similarities, they have more differences as well. Kildall was older, a family man, and much more accomplished programmer. At heart he was academic, a computer scientist with a Ph.D. Though he was nominally the head of Digital Research, he disdained making business decisions and preferred spending his time on complicated programming tasks that most CEOs would leave to their employees.

Gates was the exact opposite. He was a businessman first and a programmer second. He started Microsoft while still being a student at Harvard, and then he dropped out before finishing because his interest is getting his business going.

At the age of 25, he was still living like a college student in a messy one-bedroom apartment.

Gates and Kildall shared a capacity for getting lost in the days-long bonus of obsessive programming, their motivations were completely different. Gates would never have spent a year building a microcomputer from scratch as Kildall did, merely out of intellectual curiosity.

Gates’ all-nighters were always driven by practical business objectives and deadlines, while Kildall had more of an artistic temperament. Some said that Kildall designed computer code the way Mozart composed symphonies.

 

Continue reading Part 5Part 6Part 7Part 8Part 9, and Part 10.

The Power of Money (Part 2 of 2)

 

Continuation of Power Money by Adam Khoo (check out The Power of Money (Part 1 of 2):

 

I noticed that it was only those who never had to work hard to build their own wealth (there were also a few ministers’ and tycoons’ sons in the club) who spent like there was no tomorrow. Somehow, when you did not have to build everything from scratch, you do not really value money. This is precisely the reason why a family’s wealth (no matter how much) rarely lasts past the third generation.

 

Thank God my rich dad foresaw this terrible possibility and refused to give me a cent to start my business.

 

Then some people ask me, ‘What is the point in making so much money if you don’t enjoy it?’ The thing is that I don’t really find happiness in buying branded clothes, jewelry or sitting first class.   Even if buying something makes me happy it is only for a while, it does not last.

 

Material happiness never lasts, it just give you a quick fix. After a while you feel lousy again and have to buy the next thing which you think will make you happy. I always think that if you need material things to make you happy, then you live a pretty sad and unfulfilled life.

 

Instead, what makes me happy is when I see my children laughing and playing and learning so fast. What makes me happy is when I see my companies and trainers reaching more and more people every year in so many more countries.

 

What makes me really happy is when I read all the emails about how my books and seminars have touched and inspired someone’s life.

 

What makes me really happy is reading all your wonderful posts about how this blog is inspiring you. This happiness makes me feel really good for a long time, much much more than what a Rolex would do for me.

 

I think the point I want to put across is that happiness must come from doing your life’s work (be it teaching, building homes, designing, trading, winning tournaments etc.) and the money that comes is only a by-product. If you hate what you are doing and rely on the money you earn to make you happy by buying stuff, then I think that you are living a life of meaninglessness.

 

The obsession to make more and more money and have the latest and the best — ruins life.

DATE WITH A WOMAN (PART 1 OF 2)

 

After 21 years of Marriage, my Wife wanted me to take another Woman out to Dinner and a Movie.

She said I Love You but I know this other Woman loves you and would Love to spend some Time with You.

The other Woman that my Wife wanted me to visit was my MOTHER, who has been a Widow for 19 years, but the demands of my Work and my three Children had made it possible to visit her only occasionally.

That night I called to invite her to go out for Dinner and a Movie. ‘What’s wrong, are you well,’ she asked?

My Mother is the type of Woman who suspects that a Late Night Call or a Surprise Invitation is a sign of Bad News.

‘I thought that it would be pleasant to be with you,’ I responded. ‘Just the two of us.’

She thought about it for a moment, and then said, ‘I would like that very much.’

That Friday after work, as I drove over to pick her up I was a bit nervous. When I arrived at her House, I noticed that she too seemed to be Nervous about our Date.

She waited in the Door with her Coat on. She had curled her Hair and was wearing the Dress that she had worn to celebrate her last Wedding Anniversary.

She smiled from a face that was as radiant as an Angel’s. ‘I told my Friends that I was going to go out with My Son, and they were impressed,’

She said, as she got into the Car. ‘They can’t wait to hear about our meeting’. We went to a Restaurant that, although not Elegant, was very nice and cozy.

My Mother took my Arm as if she were the First Lady. After we sat down, I had to read the Menu. Large Print. Half way through the entries, I lifted my eyes and saw Mom sitting there staring at me.

A Nostalgic Smile was on her Lips.

 

(TO BE CONTINUED)