Conquering Your Fears (Part 3 of 3)

Do not miss out reading the first and second part.

 

Continuation:

 

What’s your “water slide”? I bet you have one, or many. We all do. What fear, if you conquered it, would allow you to have a bit more fun, experience greater success, or live life a bit more fully?

Some fears feel bigger to conquer than others. My water slide fear may not seem like the biggest fear one can have.

Having it causes me to isolate myself from the rest of my family. It even keep me from having MORE fun, joy and exhilaration in my life.

The moral lesson

Conquering your fears, one by one, builds confidence and increases your quality of life. Don’t let your fears hold you back from living the life you wish you were living.

Tips For Conquering Your Fears

  1. Recognize a fear is present
  2. Declare you are going to conquer the fear
  3. Expect to feel anxious, awkward and scared
  4. Consider copying a style you like until you find your own style
  5. Focus your attention
  6. Motivate yourself with affirmations
  7. Step into the fear with abandon
  8. Let go and have fun!
  9. Remind yourself to keep breathing
  10. Pat yourself on the back when it’s over
  11. Notice how much easier it gets

When you have time, take a personal inventory of the fears keeping you from living the life you want. Then make a commitment and challenge yourself to face and conquer one them that’s been holding you back.

Use the tips above to guide your way. To get started, see if any from the list below fit you:

Common fears

  1. Admitting mistakes or wrong-doings
  2. Adventure
  3. Being inadequate/not good enough
  4. Doing something you’ve never done before
  5. Expressing yourself
  6. Failure
  7. Healing emotional wounds
  8. Health concerns
  9. Money/finances
  10. Never having enough
  11. Public speaking
  12. Promoting yourself
  13. Saying “NO”
  14. Sharing your feelings
  15. Taking a risk, such as starting a business or changing careers
  16. Traveling

 

— end —

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Conquering Your Fears (Part 2 of 3)

Please read the first part.

 

Continuation:

 

I focused my attention on the cute and fearless little girl in front of me. I motivated myself by repeating the mantra, “if she can do it, I can do it”.

As we reached the top of the slide, I watched in amazement as she sprang from the last step to a lying down, torpedo style position in one fell swoop. As soon as the little girl shot out of sight it was my turn.

The time had come – it was now or never. Copying the little girl before me. I laid down on the slide feet first torpedo style and as I did I heard the words… Don’t fight it, just let yourself go.

As I whooshed down the slide I reminded myself I was OK, to keep breathing and to relax. As I let my body go it seemed to understand what was expected of it. It conformed to the twists and turns of the slide. It only seemed to tighten in response to my fearful thoughts.

Then I did it!

Soon, I could see the end of the ride was near. I flew off the end of the slide into the waiting water, I knew I conquered my fear!

WOW! I did it! I went down a water slide. It was a blast! My husband told me later, as I was coming down, he could hear me screaming and laughing.

All I could remember was feeling gripped by fear, exhilaration and pure joy as my body whirled down the watery, slippery path.

Now, I felt ready for more. Once wasn’t enough. The second time up the stairs was much easier. I took my position at the top of the slide with much more confidence.

The ride down the second time was even more fun because now I knew the curves and the bumps. I navigated the challenge with a bit more grace. I felt proud of myself for taking action and for doing something I thought I would never do.

 

Continue reading the last part.

Money Will Not Take Away Your Fears And Anxieties

What money cannot buy

All the money in the world will not take away your fears and anxieties. You can be the most successful person in your business, however your money and success will do nothing in getting rid of your stresses and anxieties.

So what do you do to make your fears and anxieties to go away? Well, since money and fame are not the answers, then the best solution is to be smart in how you manage your fears.

Ways in how to manage your persistent fears and anxieties

Take it one day at a time. Instead of worrying about how you will get through the rest of the week or coming month, try to focus on today.

Each day can provide us with different opportunities to learn new things and that includes learning how to deal with your problems.

Focus on the present and stop trying to predict what may happen next week. Next week will take care of itself.

Learn how to manage your fearful thoughts that may be difficult to manage.

When experiencing a negative thought, read some positive statements and affirmations that help lift your spirits and make you feel better.

Remember that your fearful thoughts may be exaggerated so balance these thoughts with realistic thinking and common sense.

Take advantage of the help that is available around you. If possible, talk to a professional who can help you manage your fears and anxieties. They will be able to provide you with additional advice and insights on how to deal with your current problem.

Great help

It will be of great help in the long run, if a person is talking to a professional. He may be able to deal with their problems in the future. Managing your fears and anxieties takes practice. The more you practice, the better you will become.

When managing your fears and anxieties do not try to tackle everything at once. The best solution is to break your fears or problems into a series of smaller steps.

Completing these smaller tasks one at a time will make the stress more manageable and increases your chances of success.

Managing your fears and anxieties will take some hard work. Sooner or later, you will have to confront your fears and anxieties. Remember that all you can do is to do your best each day, hope for the best, and take things in stride.

Patience, persistence, education, and being committed in trying to solve your problem will go along way in fixing your problems.

How Fears Develop

 

There have been talks about fears and phobias, and how they affect life. Fear is really the misconception, the rejection, and the dread of life.

There are thousands of life definitions available around. Often, these meanings seek or require a happy, if not perfect, life in this world. We are urged to seek out a paradise or a niche of refuge where we can build our utopia or ideal world.

But what really is life? If we honestly study human drama in history, we would see that real life is the concoction of good and bad, sad and happy. How to be happy in all these circumstances is what you make out of your life. We all create our life meanings. We cannot just borrow others’ meanings or get one from a book. We discover real life through actual life encounters. How we end up after each ordeal gives us our real life.

Life is a concoction of both extremes. Real life entails going through these ordeals. When you reject this idea and look for other life meanings — the kind where you live happily ever after — fears start to develop. You begin to look for fairy tale stuffs in life and reject the ones you actually have. Fear comes in, rejecting what is real. People who live in war zones have a realistic idea of life: You live now; you may die the next moment. They see that life is temporary — which is the truth. Thus, they are prepared to die anytime. Fears are still intact, but considerably lessened.

People who reject the truth are afraid to look at scenes of death or tragedy. The more they reject them, the more the fear grows within them. Many books on fears tell their readers to avoid seeing violence. You ought not to look for violence and watch it, but you ought not to close your eyes to it when there is one right under your nose. Life will always show you both extremes.

Mother Theresa was a non-violent person. Yet, she watched injustice and violence everyday, right where she was. She didn’t feel fear for these daily scenes; instead she felt love and concern in the midst of it all. She knew and lived a real life. Jesus Christ and Mahatma Gandhi were for non-violence. Yet they found real meaning and real life as they were caught in the middle of chaos and turmoil. These excellent people lived the real life. They even conquered others’ fears.

The rejection of the real life is the start of real fears. Fearful and phobic people refuse reality and build their own fantasy world.

Whose Hands It’s In?

 

A basketball in my hands is worth about $25.
A basketball in LeBron James’
hands is worth about $34 million.
It depends whose hands it’s in.

A baseball in my hands is worth about $10.
A baseball in Mike Tout’s hands is worth $16 million.
It depends whose hands it’s in.

A tennis racket is useless in my hands.
A tennis racket in Serena Williams’
hands is a Championship Winning.
It depends whose hands it’s in.

A rod in my hands will keep away a wild animal.
A rod in Moses’ hands will part the mighty sea.
It depends whose hands it’s in.

A sling shot in my hands is a kid’s toy
A sling shot in David’s hand is a mighty weapon.
It depends whose hands it’s in.

Two fish and 5 loaves of bread in my
hands is a couple of fish sandwiches.
Two fish and 5 loaves of bread in
God’s hands will feed thousands.
It depends whose hands it’s in.

Nails in my hands might produce a birdhouse
Nails in Jesus Christ’s hands will
produce salvation for the entire world.
It depends whose hands it’s in.

As you see now it depends whose hands it’s in.
So put your concerns, your worries, your fears,
your hopes, your dreams, your families and your
relationships in God’s hands because…

It depends whose hands it’s in.

This message is now in your hands.
What will YOU do with it?