Tag: failure

Hypnosis, Magnetism and Luck (Part 3 of 3)

Please read the First Part and Second Part.

 

Continuation:

 

These emotions are necessary as your visualization will not work without them. It also takes care of the negativity you may otherwise experience throughout your normal day.

The more you practice your visualization in this manner the more positive you will feel during your normal day and therefore the less negative thoughts and emotions you will be focused on.

The second reason for failure, when trying to consciously use the law of attraction and visualization is the lack of action. We live in a world that is regulated and created by thought but it is also in a state of motion.

You need to take some action that will get you closer to your goal. No matter how small the action is it will add power to the forces of the law of attraction. I cannot stress this enough.

We may be capable of achieving things through thought alone but we, as a species and individuals, are not yet spiritually/emotionally evolved enough to create our desires through thought alone – we are carrying around too much negative thoughts and feelings. So take some action!

For many people, myself included, it is hard to create a mental image that is clear and detailed. There are a few times when I also find it hard to evoke the emotions that are necessary to activate the law of attraction.

I have found that hypnosis is invaluable on such occasions. When I am hypnotized and deeply relaxed I find it much easier to create mental images and mental movies.

I also find that it is easier to get in touch with my emotions and thus evoke the necessary feelings I need to activate the law of attraction.

Follow my guidelines and people will soon by commenting on how lucky you are. However, you will know that it is not luck but merely magnetism deliberately created by following laws as old as time itself.

 

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How To Overcome The Fear Of Failure

 

Some people will have to deal with managing the failure of failure during their lifetime. They are so afraid of failing or not making it that they become very anxious.

Here are some steps on how to manage the fear of failure in your life.

It is best to have at least have tried than not to try at all. Do you want to go through the rest of your life not knowing that you could of made it? At least if you try, you will know for sure if you would have made it.

Another benefit of giving something a try is that you can learn from your mistakes. If your first attempt doesn’t work out, then at least you know what went wrong. If you decide to do that task again you will know what to do which will increase your chance of success.

If you are afraid to fail at a certain task, then develop some kind of back up plan for you to rely on in case you do fail. For instance, let’s say that you are afraid that you will not pass a certain class in school. Develop a plan B for yourself in case you do not pass the class. This will reduce your stress and take the pressure of taking the test and passing. If you don’t make it, you have something to fall back on.

Ask yourself what is the worse that can happen. Think about it. What will you lose if you don’t make it the first or second time? Yes, it might be a set back, but you had set backs before. Tell yourself that you will not succeed at everything in life and that will help reduce your anxieties.

Fear of failure can be a struggle for some people, however the worst part is not to at least try. You don’t want to go through life wondering whether you could have made it or not. If you fear to fail, then, you just did failed.

Bill Gates and The Guy Who Could Have Been Him (Part 8 of 10)

Appreciate more the story, read the previous post:

Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6 and Part 7.

 

In the summer of 1980, Sams told Gates that Kildall wasn’t working out, and that the operating system issue was now Gates’ problem to solve. Gates picked up Kildall’s mess and rant with it. He gave Sams the promise that Kildall would not, he (Gates) would produce a detailed plan for an operating system by October. The only difference was that Gates promise without having an actual operating system to work with.

Throughout the 1980, Kildall’s failure to set a hard release date for CP/M-86 fueled a rising sense of panic among manufacturers who needed the operating system for their new 8086 machines. In effect, Kildall’s delays were holding the whole industry hostage.

Across town from Microsoft, a little computer maker called SCP (Seattle Computer Products), came up with a stopgap solution. A programmer there spent months working from the CP/M technical manual to write a new operating system so similar to CP/M that would allow all CP/M-compatible software to work on the new 8086 machines. He called the operating system QDOS (Quick and Dirty Operating System). SCP’s computers will use QDOS until CP/M-86 was released.

When gates and Allen heard about QDOS, they figured they might be able to meet IBM’s tight schedule by buying QDOS and then giving it a spit-shine and a new name. Allen knew the owner of SCP fairly well, and he negotiated the rights for Microsoft to use QDOS for the grand sum of $25,000.

The cash-starved owner at SCP took the money gladly, with no idea that IBM would be QDOS’s ultimate customer. It took several months of around-the-clock programming to massage, tweak, and test QDOS before Microsoft presented a finished product to IBM engineers under its new name: MS DOS (Microsoft Disk Operating System).

 

Continue reading Part 9 and Part 10.

Toyota – More of a State-of-Mind than an Auto Maker

 

Toyota first caught the world’s attention in the 1980s, when it became clear that there was something special about Japanese quality and efficiency.

Japanese cars were lasting longer than American cars and required much less repair. By the 1990s it became apparent that there was something more special about Toyota compared to other automakers in Japan.

It was not eye-popping car designs or performance, though ride was smooth and the designs often very refined. Rather, it was the way Toyota engineered and manufactured the autos that led to unbelievable consistency in the process of the product.

Toyota designed autos faster, with more reliability, yet at competitive cost, even when paying the relatively high wages of Japanese workers.

Equally impressive was that every time Toyota showed an apparent weakness and seemed vulnerable to the competition, Toyota miraculously fixed the problem and came back even stronger.

Today Toyota is the third-largest auto maker in the world, behind Volkswagen and Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi Alliance. However, Toyota is more profitable than any other auto makers.

Much of Toyota’s success comes from its astounding quality reputation. Consumers know that they can count on their Toyota vehicle to work right the first time and keep on working, while most U.S and European auto companies produce vehicles that may work when new but almost certainly will spend time in the shop in a year or so.

What is the secret of Toyota’s success? The incredible consistency of Toyota’s performance is a direct result of operational excellence, its strategic weapon.

This operational excellence is based in part of tools and quality improvement methods made famous by Toyota in the manufacturing world, such as just-in-time, kaizen, one-piece flow, jidoka and heijunka. These techniques helped spawned the “lean manufacturing” revolution. But tools and techniques are no secret weapon for transforming the business. It is their continued success at implementing these tools stems from a deeper business philosophy based on its understanding of people and human innovation.

Its success is ultimately based on its ability to cultivate leadership, teams, and culture, and to devise strategy, to build supplier relationships and to maintain a learning organization.

The Other Side of Setbacks

 

American swimmer Dara Torres had a remarkable career. She appeared in five different Olympics from 1984 to 2008.

Late in her career, Torres broke the US record for the 50-meter freestyle – 25 years after she herself set that record, but it wasn’t always the medals and records.

She also encountered a lot of obstacles in her athletic career. Failure after another, mistakes after mistakes, injuries, surgery, and being almost twice the age of most other competitors.

She said, “I’ve wanted to win at everything, every day, since I was a kid.., I’m also aware that setbacks have upside; they fuel new dreams.”

“Setbacks have an upside” is a great life lesson. Her struggles motivated her to reach for new heights.

Romans 5:3-5 states that “… we also rejoice in sufferings, because we know that suffering produces perseverance; perseverance produces character, and character produces hope. And hope does not disappoint us…” The Apostle James also told us “consider it pure joy, my brothers, when you encounter trials of many kinds, because you know that testing of your faith develops perseverance. Allow perseverance to finish its work…”

Adopting this perseverance on the difficulties of life is not easy, but worthwhile. Trials provide opportunity to deepen our relationship with God. They also teach lessons that success cannot by developing the kind of patience that waits on God and trust Him for the strength to endure.

I remember an excerpt from one of my prayers when I was in one of the darkest days of my life way back then,

“Lord, I hope my prayers will be answered tomorrow, else I could die, but if it remains a ‘no’ until tomorrow and I am still alive, teach me to be more patient and help me to understand more Your reasons, though the same reasons I may not know until tomorrow or the next month or the next decade. All I know is that what is happening at this very moment is for my own sake and my family’s welfare, so that I can share this experience to anyone in the future, so that Your light will shine to others through me, even at darkness”.