Tag: failure

Genuine Happiness Comes from Within (Part 1 of 2)

Life isn’t the sweetest candy

Sometimes, when I feel like the world is just too heavy, I look around and find people who continued to live fascinating and wonderful lives. And then thoughts come popping into my mind like bubbles from nowhere – “How did their life become so adorably sweet?

How come they still can manage to laugh and play around despite a busy stressful life?” Then I pause and observed for a while… I figured out that maybe, they start to work on a place called ‘self’.

So, how does one become genuinely happy? Step 1 is to love yourself.

My theology professor once said that “loving means accepting.” To love oneself means to accept that you are not a perfect being, but behind the imperfections must lie a great ounce of courage to be able to discover ways on how to improve your repertoire to recover from our mistakes.

Genuine happiness also pertains to contentment

When you are contented with the job you have, the way you look, with your family, your friends, the place you live in, your car, and all the things you now have – truly, you know the answer to the question “how to be genuinely happy.”

When we discover a small start somewhere from within, that small start will eventually lead to something else, and to something else. But if you keep questioning life lit it has never done you any good, you will never be able to find genuine happiness.

I believe that life is about finding out about right and wrong, trying and failing, winning and losing. These are things that happen as often as you inhale and exhale.

Failure, in a person’s life has become as abundant and necessary as air. But this should not hinder us from becoming happy.

How to be genuinely happy in spite all these?

I tell you… every time you exert effort to improve the quality of life and your being, whether it is cleaning up your room, helping a friend, taking care of your sick dog, fail on board exams and trying again, life gives you equivalent points for that.

 

(TO BE CONTINUED)

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Hypnosis, Magnetism and Luck (Part 3 of 3)

Please read the First Part and Second Part.

 

Continuation:

 

These emotions are necessary as your visualization will not work without them. It also takes care of the negativity you may otherwise experience throughout your normal day.

The more you practice your visualization in this manner the more positive you will feel during your normal day and therefore the less negative thoughts and emotions you will be focused on.

The second reason for failure, when trying to consciously use the law of attraction and visualization is the lack of action. We live in a world that is regulated and created by thought but it is also in a state of motion.

You need to take some action that will get you closer to your goal. No matter how small the action is it will add power to the forces of the law of attraction. I cannot stress this enough.

We may be capable of achieving things through thought alone but we, as a species and individuals, are not yet spiritually/emotionally evolved enough to create our desires through thought alone – we are carrying around too much negative thoughts and feelings. So take some action!

For many people, myself included, it is hard to create a mental image that is clear and detailed. There are a few times when I also find it hard to evoke the emotions that are necessary to activate the law of attraction.

I have found that hypnosis is invaluable on such occasions. When I am hypnotized and deeply relaxed I find it much easier to create mental images and mental movies.

I also find that it is easier to get in touch with my emotions and thus evoke the necessary feelings I need to activate the law of attraction.

Follow my guidelines and people will soon by commenting on how lucky you are. However, you will know that it is not luck but merely magnetism deliberately created by following laws as old as time itself.

 

— end —

How To Overcome The Fear Of Failure

 

Some people will have to deal with managing the failure of failure during their lifetime. They are so afraid of failing or not making it that they become very anxious.

Here are some steps on how to manage the fear of failure in your life.

It is best to have at least have tried than not to try at all. Do you want to go through the rest of your life not knowing that you could of made it? At least if you try, you will know for sure if you would have made it.

Another benefit of giving something a try is that you can learn from your mistakes. If your first attempt doesn’t work out, then at least you know what went wrong. If you decide to do that task again you will know what to do which will increase your chance of success.

If you are afraid to fail at a certain task, then develop some kind of back up plan for you to rely on in case you do fail. For instance, let’s say that you are afraid that you will not pass a certain class in school. Develop a plan B for yourself in case you do not pass the class. This will reduce your stress and take the pressure of taking the test and passing. If you don’t make it, you have something to fall back on.

Ask yourself what is the worse that can happen. Think about it. What will you lose if you don’t make it the first or second time? Yes, it might be a set back, but you had set backs before. Tell yourself that you will not succeed at everything in life and that will help reduce your anxieties.

Fear of failure can be a struggle for some people, however the worst part is not to at least try. You don’t want to go through life wondering whether you could have made it or not. If you fear to fail, then, you just did failed.

Bill Gates and The Guy Who Could Have Been Him (Part 8 of 10)

Appreciate more the story, read the previous post:

Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6 and Part 7.

 

In the summer of 1980, Sams told Gates that Kildall wasn’t working out, and that the operating system issue was now Gates’ problem to solve. Gates picked up Kildall’s mess and rant with it. He gave Sams the promise that Kildall would not, he (Gates) would produce a detailed plan for an operating system by October. The only difference was that Gates promise without having an actual operating system to work with.

Throughout the 1980, Kildall’s failure to set a hard release date for CP/M-86 fueled a rising sense of panic among manufacturers who needed the operating system for their new 8086 machines. In effect, Kildall’s delays were holding the whole industry hostage.

Across town from Microsoft, a little computer maker called SCP (Seattle Computer Products), came up with a stopgap solution. A programmer there spent months working from the CP/M technical manual to write a new operating system so similar to CP/M that would allow all CP/M-compatible software to work on the new 8086 machines. He called the operating system QDOS (Quick and Dirty Operating System). SCP’s computers will use QDOS until CP/M-86 was released.

When gates and Allen heard about QDOS, they figured they might be able to meet IBM’s tight schedule by buying QDOS and then giving it a spit-shine and a new name. Allen knew the owner of SCP fairly well, and he negotiated the rights for Microsoft to use QDOS for the grand sum of $25,000.

The cash-starved owner at SCP took the money gladly, with no idea that IBM would be QDOS’s ultimate customer. It took several months of around-the-clock programming to massage, tweak, and test QDOS before Microsoft presented a finished product to IBM engineers under its new name: MS DOS (Microsoft Disk Operating System).

 

Continue reading Part 9 and Part 10.

Toyota – More of a State-of-Mind than an Auto Maker

 

Toyota first caught the world’s attention in the 1980s, when it became clear that there was something special about Japanese quality and efficiency.

Japanese cars were lasting longer than American cars and required much less repair. By the 1990s it became apparent that there was something more special about Toyota compared to other automakers in Japan.

It was not eye-popping car designs or performance, though ride was smooth and the designs often very refined. Rather, it was the way Toyota engineered and manufactured the autos that led to unbelievable consistency in the process of the product.

Toyota designed autos faster, with more reliability, yet at competitive cost, even when paying the relatively high wages of Japanese workers.

Equally impressive was that every time Toyota showed an apparent weakness and seemed vulnerable to the competition, Toyota miraculously fixed the problem and came back even stronger.

Today Toyota is the third-largest auto maker in the world, behind Volkswagen and Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi Alliance. However, Toyota is more profitable than any other auto makers.

Much of Toyota’s success comes from its astounding quality reputation. Consumers know that they can count on their Toyota vehicle to work right the first time and keep on working, while most U.S and European auto companies produce vehicles that may work when new but almost certainly will spend time in the shop in a year or so.

What is the secret of Toyota’s success? The incredible consistency of Toyota’s performance is a direct result of operational excellence, its strategic weapon.

This operational excellence is based in part of tools and quality improvement methods made famous by Toyota in the manufacturing world, such as just-in-time, kaizen, one-piece flow, jidoka and heijunka. These techniques helped spawned the “lean manufacturing” revolution. But tools and techniques are no secret weapon for transforming the business. It is their continued success at implementing these tools stems from a deeper business philosophy based on its understanding of people and human innovation.

Its success is ultimately based on its ability to cultivate leadership, teams, and culture, and to devise strategy, to build supplier relationships and to maintain a learning organization.