Tag: confidence

Waking up to Improve Personal Life (Part 1 of 2)

Wake up and improve

When life gets us down

We all have responsibilities and obligations to accomplish in life. Sometimes life gets us down when demands and obstacles get in our way. Most of the time, it seems as though life is about other people.

We often wonder how much of our life is truly your own? When life gets you down, you have to take a step back to look over the areas that cause you stress.

Wouldn’t it be fantastic if you were doing what your loved? Perhaps you can acquire assertive skills. Do you need to build your self-esteem and do you hang around positive influences?

Do you live to produce new ideas that help you to improve your personal life? Are you developing great relationships?

The hypnotherapy

If you have issues or problems with improving your life, perhaps you can visit a therapist or hypnotherapist. These questions all lead up to improving personal life.

For this reason, if you need help you may want to seek advice of professionals. A therapist can help you deal with the problems you may have.

Some of us have hidden keys that lead us to success. Inside the hidden messages are keys that open the door that helps one to deal with life changes and challenges, which ordinarily discourages one from taking the right course in life.

How does hypnotherapy work?

Hypnotherapy assists one with dealing with many life discouragements by helping us to find the hidden notes the mind. Inside the mind, you have many natural elements that help you to lose weight, quite smoking, manage pain, etc.

You have the ability to build self-esteem, confidence, etc as well as counseling yourself to live happier. Hypnotherapy will also help you grow in your personal relationships. The therapeutic method will help you to balance and to live one day at a time.

 

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Waking up to Improve Personal Life (Part 2 of 2)

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An Ideal Leader (Part 2 of 2)

Do not miss out the first part.

 

Continuation:

 

Not about what you make others do

Being a leader is not about what you make others do. It’s about who you are, what you know, and what you do. You are a reflection of what you’re subordinates must be.

Studies have shown that one other bases of good leadership is the trust and confidence your subordinates have of you. If they trust you they will go through hell and high water for you and for the organization.

Trust and confidence

Trust and confidence is built on good relationships, trustworthiness, and high ethics.

The way you deal with your people, and the relationships you build will lay the foundation for the strength of your group. The stronger your relationship, the stronger their trust and confidence is in your capabilities.

Once you have their trust and confidence, you may now proceed to communicate the goals and objectives you are to undertake.

The key

Communication is a very important key to good leadership. Without this you cannot be a good leader. The knowledge and technical expertise you have must be clearly imparted to other people.

Also, you cannot be a good leader and unless you have good judgment. You must be able to assess situations, weigh the pros and cons of any decision, and actively seek out a solution.

It is this judgment that your subordinates will come to rely upon. Therefore, good decision-making is vital to the success of your organization.

Not do-it-all heroes

Leaders are not do-it-all heroes. You should not claim to know everything, and you should not rely upon your skills alone.

You should recognize and take advantage of the skills and talents your subordinates have. Only when you come to this realization will you be able to work as one cohesive unit.

Cannot be learned overnight

Remember being a leader takes a good deal of work and time. It is not learned overnight. Remember, also, that it is not about just you. It is about you and the people around you.

Are you a leader?

So, do you have the drive and the desire to serve required of leaders? Do you have the desire to work cooperatively with other people? Then start now. Take your stand and be leader today.

 

— end —

Instinct Develops With Age (Part 2 of 2)

Do not miss out the first part.

 

Continuation:

 

They find it much easier to see pros and cons visually. So when deciding which new car ‘wins’, write a time-limited brainstorm.

Setting yourself just 10 minutes of writing down the essential ‘fors’ and ’against’ will focus your mind and lead to a better decision.

Road-Test Your Rationale

With bigger decisions, like whether to buy a house that you love, has money-pit potential. It’s good to combine instinct with some nuts-and-bolts back-up .

This has big consequences and it’s likely to be something you’ve done too many times before. Because it’s unfamiliar, it’s likely your instinct won’t be a good guide.

If it feels like somewhere you’ll be happy, test out your intuition with a practical steps. It maybe drawing up a list of which features matter most to you. No matter whether it ticks enough most to you. Or it ticks enough practical as well as emotional.

The Two-Minute Face Saver

The snap decision we often get wrong is what kind of ‘advice’ to let tumble from our unzipped lips. So take the two-minute offence test.

A colleague presenting a flawed project, or a friend wearing a fright of an outfit. You will find it there’s a good test of whether it’s right to chime in with device .

If you feel your sentence should start with,’ I know I shouldn’t say this, but..’ then your gut is telling you to keep shut. So do.

Fake Complete Confidence

Knowing how to use your instincts at work means understanding the kind of person you are.

Are you letting worry get in the way? Optimists will just give something a go and assume it’ll be all right. Pessimists think being right is more important then the outcome.

We tend to think getting something absolutely right is more important than it really is. So in a meeting or when directing stuff, it’s often more important to simply take a decision and work with it than foster an atmosphere of uncertainty where no one can get on.

If you trust instincts, so will they.

 

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Conquering Your Fears (Part 3 of 3)

Do not miss out reading the first and second part.

 

Continuation:

 

What’s your “water slide”? I bet you have one, or many. We all do. What fear, if you conquered it, would allow you to have a bit more fun, experience greater success, or live life a bit more fully?

Some fears feel bigger to conquer than others. My water slide fear may not seem like the biggest fear one can have.

Having it causes me to isolate myself from the rest of my family. It even keep me from having MORE fun, joy and exhilaration in my life.

The moral lesson

Conquering your fears, one by one, builds confidence and increases your quality of life. Don’t let your fears hold you back from living the life you wish you were living.

Tips For Conquering Your Fears

  1. Recognize a fear is present
  2. Declare you are going to conquer the fear
  3. Expect to feel anxious, awkward and scared
  4. Consider copying a style you like until you find your own style
  5. Focus your attention
  6. Motivate yourself with affirmations
  7. Step into the fear with abandon
  8. Let go and have fun!
  9. Remind yourself to keep breathing
  10. Pat yourself on the back when it’s over
  11. Notice how much easier it gets

When you have time, take a personal inventory of the fears keeping you from living the life you want. Then make a commitment and challenge yourself to face and conquer one them that’s been holding you back.

Use the tips above to guide your way. To get started, see if any from the list below fit you:

Common fears

  1. Admitting mistakes or wrong-doings
  2. Adventure
  3. Being inadequate/not good enough
  4. Doing something you’ve never done before
  5. Expressing yourself
  6. Failure
  7. Healing emotional wounds
  8. Health concerns
  9. Money/finances
  10. Never having enough
  11. Public speaking
  12. Promoting yourself
  13. Saying “NO”
  14. Sharing your feelings
  15. Taking a risk, such as starting a business or changing careers
  16. Traveling

 

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Conquering Your Fears (Part 2 of 3)

Please read the first part.

 

Continuation:

 

I focused my attention on the cute and fearless little girl in front of me. I motivated myself by repeating the mantra, “if she can do it, I can do it”.

As we reached the top of the slide, I watched in amazement as she sprang from the last step to a lying down, torpedo style position in one fell swoop. As soon as the little girl shot out of sight it was my turn.

The time had come – it was now or never. Copying the little girl before me. I laid down on the slide feet first torpedo style and as I did I heard the words… Don’t fight it, just let yourself go.

As I whooshed down the slide I reminded myself I was OK, to keep breathing and to relax. As I let my body go it seemed to understand what was expected of it. It conformed to the twists and turns of the slide. It only seemed to tighten in response to my fearful thoughts.

Then I did it!

Soon, I could see the end of the ride was near. I flew off the end of the slide into the waiting water, I knew I conquered my fear!

WOW! I did it! I went down a water slide. It was a blast! My husband told me later, as I was coming down, he could hear me screaming and laughing.

All I could remember was feeling gripped by fear, exhilaration and pure joy as my body whirled down the watery, slippery path.

Now, I felt ready for more. Once wasn’t enough. The second time up the stairs was much easier. I took my position at the top of the slide with much more confidence.

The ride down the second time was even more fun because now I knew the curves and the bumps. I navigated the challenge with a bit more grace. I felt proud of myself for taking action and for doing something I thought I would never do.

 

Continue reading the last part.