spiral graphics used in hypnotism

The Truth About Hypnosis (Part 2 of 4)

Please read the previous article:

The Truth About Hypnosis (Part 1 of 4)

 

Continuation:

 

Hypnotic trance is really just a state of deep relaxation which creates alpha and sometimes theta waves in the brain. Sometimes a subject can be in a fairly deep state of trance without even knowing it. They merely think they are very relaxed. In very rare cases the subject thinks they just fell asleep!

Everyone can be under the spell of hypnotism

Everyone can be under the spell of hypnotism. However, all forms of Hypnosis are really self-hypnosis. For in order to hypnotize by someone, you must first be willing to hand over control to the hypnotist. Without consensual participation from a subject a hypnotist is virtually powerless.

It is extremely difficult to hypnotize a person who is under the influence of liquor or drugs. These people are already in a self-induced state of trance.

Trance is directing them into a different altered state becomes almost impossible. In addition it is impossible to hypnotize someone who is adamant they don’t want to undergo hypnosis!

The hypnotherapy

Hypnotherapy is a very specific form of hypnosis use mostly by health care professionals. As hypnosis is an extremely powerful tool for gaining access to the subconscious mind. Many emotionally-created illnesses can be treated with hypnotherapy.

In fact, as the medical profession becomes more aware of the role the mind plays in illness and healing, they have that some physical ailments, such as warts and skin disorders like eczema, can be successfully treated with hypnosis.

Simply stated Hypnotherapy is an alternative therapy. It uses hypnosis as a catalyst for creating inner change in a patient. That may take months or even years of traditional therapy techniques!

It is safe

Hypnosis is completely safe! It is just an efficient quick method for entering a deep relaxation, natural state of mind and body. There are no drugs involved, no unpleasant nor unwanted side-effects and it is in no way addictive.

 

(TO BE CONTINUED)

Advertisements
man sitting on the rocks meditating

Meditation: A Path To Inner Peace (Part 1 of 4)

A path to inner peace

Throughout history, meditation has been an integral part of many cultures. Records indicate that meditation was practiced in ancient Greece and India more than 5,000 years ago.

In the Buddhist religion, meditation is an important part of their spiritual practice. Different forms of meditation also practice in China and Japan, and Christianity, Judaism, and Islam have traditions similar to meditation.

The word meditation comes from the Latin ‘meditari’ which means: exercise, turn something over in one’s mind, think, consider. Its definition is “consciously directing your attention to alter your state of mind.”

The alternative therapy

Meditation is one of the proven alternative therapies that in recent years have been classified under the mind-body medicine therapies.

It is continuing to gain popularity, as more and more health experts believe that there is more to the connection between mind and body than modern medicine can explain.

Meditation aids the immune system and improve brain activity, according to researchers.

More and more doctors are prescribing meditation as a way to lower blood pressure, improve exercise performance, for people with angina, to help people with asthma to breathe easier, to relieve insomnia, and generally relax everyday stresses of life.

Many hospitals now offer meditation classes for their patients because of the health benefits. All promote physiological health and well-being.

For spiritual growth, now for managing stress

Traditionally, meditation is use for spiritual growth. Recently, it become a valuable tool for managing stress and finding a place of peace, relaxation, and tranquility in a demanding fast-paced world.

Benefits resulting from meditation include: physical and emotional healing; easing stress, fear, and grief; improved breathing; developing intuition; deep relaxation; exploring higher realities; finding inner guidance; unlocking creativity; manifesting change; emotional cleansing and balancing; and deepening concentration and insight.

A.K.A (also known as)

Meditation elicits many descriptive terms: stillness, silence, tranquility, peace, quiet, and calm. All counter stress and tension.

 

Continue reading:

Meditation: A Path To Inner Peace (Part 2 of 4)

Meditation: A Path To Inner Peace (Part 3 of 4)

Meditation: A Path To Inner Peace (Part 4 of 4)