Tag: ad congress

OPPORTUNITY (JOHN GOKONGWEI JR.’S AD CONGRESS SPEECH, EDITED, PART 3 OF 10)

 

Please read Part I and Part II

 

Continuation:

And so I continued to work. In 1943, I expanded and began trading goods between Cebu and Manila. From Cebu, I would transport tires on a small boat called a batel. After traveling for five days to Lucena (Capital City of Quezon Province, located in Southern Luzon Island), I would load them into a truck for the six- hour trip to Manila. I would end up sitting on top of my goods so they would not be stolen! In Manila, I would then purchase other goods from the earnings I made from the tires, to sell in Cebu.

Then, when WWII ended, I saw the opportunity for trading goods in post-war Philippines I was 20 years old. With my brother Henry, I put up Amasia Trading which imported onions, flour, used clothing, old newspapers and magazines, and fruits from the United States. In 1948, my mother and I got my siblings back from China. I also converted a two-story building in Cebu to serve as our home, office, and warehouse all at the same time. The whole family began helping out with the business.

In 1957, at age 31, I spotted an opportunity in corn-starch manufacturing. But I was going to compete with Ludo and Luym, the richest group in Cebu and the biggest cornstarch manufacturers. I borrowed money to finance the project. The first bank I approached made me wait for two hours, only to refuse my loan. The second one, China Bank, approved a P500,000-peso clean loan for me. Years later, the banker who extended that loan, Dr. Albino Sycip said that he saw something special in me. Today, I still wonder what that was, but I still thank Dr. Sycip to this day.

Upon launching our first product, Panda corn starch, a price war ensued. After the smoke cleared, Universal Corn Products was still left standing. It is the foundation upon which JG Summit Holdings now stands.

Interestingly, the price war also forced the closure of a third cornstarch company, and one of their chemists was Lucio Tan, who always kids me that I caused him to lose his job. I always reply that if it were not for me, he will not be one of the richest men in the Philippines today.

 

Continue reading:

GROWING (PART 4 OF 10)

PERSEVERANCE (PART 5 OF 10)

DETERMINATION (PART 6 OF 10)

INNOVATION (PART 7 OF 10)

REAL PROMISING (PART 8 OF 10)

ASPIRATION (PART 9 OF 10)

LOOKING BACK (PART 10 OF 10)

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HARD-WORK (JOHN GOKONGWEI JR.’S AD CONGRESS SPEECH, EDITED, PART 2 OF 10)’

 

Please don’t missed out the first part, The Irreplaceable Lost

 

Continuation:

 

My mother sent my siblings to China where living standards were lower. She and I stayed in Cebu to work, and we sent them money regularly. My mother sold her jewelry. When that ran out, we sold roasted peanuts in the backyard of our much-smaller home. When that wasn’t enough, I opened a small stall in a WET MARKET. I chose one among several wet market a few miles outside the city because there were fewer goods available for the people there. I woke up at five o’clock every morning for the long bicycle ride to the wet market with my basket of goods.

There, I set up a table about three feet by two feet in size. I laid out my goods-soap, candles, and thread-and kept selling until everything was bought. Why these goods? Because these were hard times and this was a poor village, so people wanted and needed the basics-soap to keep them clean, candles to light the night, and thread to sew their clothes.

I was surrounded by other vendors, all of them much older. Many of them could be my grandparents. And they knew the ways of the wet market far more than a boy of 15, especially one who had never worked before.

But being young had its advantages. I did not tire as easily, and I moved more quickly. I was also more aggressive. After each day, I would make about 20 pesos in profit! There was enough to feed my siblings and still enough to pour back into the business. The pesos I made in the wet market were the pesos that went into building the business I have today.

After this experience, I told myself, “If I can compete with people so much older than me, if I can support my whole family at 15, I can do anything!”

Looking back, I wonder, what would have happened if my father had not left my family with nothing? Would I have become the man I am? Who knows?

The important thing to know is that life will always deal us a few bad cards. But we have to play those cards the best we can. And WE can play to win!

This was one lesson I picked up when I was a teenager. It has been my guiding principle ever since. And I have had 66 years to practice self-determination. When I wanted something, the best person to depend on was myself.

 

Continue reading:

OPPORTUNITY (PART 3 OF 10)

GROWING (PART 4 OF 10)

PERSEVERANCE (PART 5 OF 10)

DETERMINATION (PART 6 OF 10)

INNOVATION (PART 7 OF 10)

REAL PROMISING (PART 8 OF 10)

ASPIRATION (PART 9 OF 10)

LOOKING BACK (PART 10 OF 10)

THE IRREPLACEABLE LOSS (JOHN GOKONGWEI JR.’S AD CONGRESS SPEECH, EDITED, PART 1 OF 10)

This blog is to inspire every one. A real story of rags to riches, of why failures are manifestations of  successes, of how hard-work changes life and of how a dream do come true.

This is the brief biography of John Gokongwei Jr. through his speech:

I would like to talk about my life, entrepreneurship, and globalization. I would like to talk about how we can become a great nation.

You may wonder how one is connected to the other, but I promise that, as there is truth in advertising, the connection will come.

Let me begin with a story I have told many times. My own.

I was born to a rich Chinese-Filipino family. I spent my childhood in Cebu (a City in the South where its economy is next to Manila) where my father owned a chain of movie houses, including the first air-conditioned one outside Manila. I was the eldest of six children and lived in a big house in Cebu’s Forbes Park.

A chauffeur drove me to school every day as I went to San Carlos University, then and still one of the country’s top schools. I topped my classes and had many friends. I would bring them to watch movies for free at my father’s movie houses.

When I was 13, my father died suddenly of complications due to typhoid. Everything I enjoyed vanished instantly. My father’s empire was built on credit. When he died, we lost everything – our big house, our cars, and our business to the banks.

I felt angry at the world for taking away my father, and for taking away all that I enjoyed before. When the free movies disappeared, I also LOST HALF OF MY FRIENDS. On the day I had to walk two miles to school for the very first time, I cried to my mother, a widow at 32. But she said: “You should feel lucky. Some people have no shoes to walk to school. What can you do? Your father died with 10 centavos in his pocket.”

So, what can I do? I WORKED.

 

Continue reading:

HARD-WORK (PART 2 OF 10)

OPPORTUNITY (PART 3 OF 10)

GROWING (PART 4 OF 10)

PERSEVERANCE (PART 5 OF 10)

DETERMINATION (PART 6 OF 10)

INNOVATION (PART 7 OF 10)

REAL PROMISING (PART 8 OF 10)

ASPIRATION (PART 9 OF 10)

LOOKING BACK (PART 10 OF 10)