Category: Life Journey

Change (Part 2 of 2)

Do not miss the first part. Read it here.

 

Continuation:

 

The final and most rewarding possibility are the people who understand that change is a part of everything.

When we stop evolving, we start eroding. These people welcome change, in fact, they frequently generate it. They realize that change is what makes things happen.

Change propels us forward. These people are quick to make the necessary adaptations and suffer the least from the inevitable.

Questions to self

Do you recognize your own character in any of the above descriptions? Have you read Spencer Johnson’s book, Who Moved My Cheese? This book is an excellent description of the four possible characters in the Change Game.

In the book, the first character was a little person named Hem. Hem was afraid of change and believed it would make things worse. He avoided it at all costs.

The second character was a mouse named, Scurry. Scurry ran around in circles, just attempting to do something, anything. Sometimes he was right, sometimes wrong but he was constantly in motion.

The third character was a little person named Haw. Haw was slow to figure things out but eventually he adapted to the change and realized that the change could bring something better.

However, the real winner was the mouse, Sniff. Sniff jumped into action early, sniffing out the terrain and making a choice on what to do next. He adapted the quickest.

Which character are you? Who would you like to be? What would you have to give up to be the character you really want to be? Would you like to make a plan right now to implement these changes into your life? It will require a commitment and a good plan.

All of us needs a coach

This is where a coach can be helpful. When you identify an area in your life that requires some attention and you commit to making the necessary adjustments, it’s strange how life gets in the way sometime and we revert back to our previous ways.

A coach is someone who can keep you on track and pointed in the direction of your goals. A coach will support your progress and hold you accountable for the goals you set.

 

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Change (Part 1 of 2)

The only thing that never change is change

Things never stay the same

One thing in life is certain—change. Things never stay the same. If you are hoping for the status quo, then I’m afraid you will be disappointed. Just think back to how things were five years ago and you will realize that there is so very much that’s already different in a very short time.

I’m sure there are some of you who know people who refused to adapt to the computer age. I still know some “old timers” who want to use word processors or even typewriters instead! Imagine. What is up with that?

Again, our choice

Well, when change comes we have several options, some of which are more adaptive than others. Let’s take a look at them.

The first option is to refuse to change or adapt to any new circumstances.

Just like the person who still uses a word processor. These are generally people who are afraid of change. I also think that underlying that fear is the fear of being inadequate.

When change requires new learning, as it often does, some people don’t think they will be able to master the new skills so it is easier to simply renounce the changes than adapt. The problem is that these are the people who are left in the dust.

The second possibility is the slow starter.

These people usually start out in one of the first two mentioned roles. Either refusing to change or anxiously running around trying to figure out what to do about it.

They do not like change any more than the next person and they resist and resist until one day, they realize that the change may actually bring benefits. Once they see that there is a payoff for them, they fairly easily do the necessary things to adapt to the change.

A third possibility is what we see in the over anxious people in our midst.

You know who they are. They are the ones who are always making mountains out of molehills. Those who have a nervous energy about them whenever confronted with a novel situation.

They imagine all the possible scenarios about what could occur and seem to just go around in circles. Those who don’t adapt to the change. They just worry themselves sick over it.

 

(TO BE CONTINUED)

Spiritual Growth: The Spiritual Challenge of Modern Times (Part 2 of 2)

Do not miss the wonderful first part.

 

Continuation:

 

To grow spiritually is to search for meaning

Religions that believe in the existence of God such as Christianity, Judaism, and Islam suppose that the purpose of the human life is to serve the Creator of all things.

Several theories in psychology propose that we ultimately give meaning to our lives. Whether we believe that life’s meaning is pre-determined or self-directed, to grow in spirit is to realize that we do not merely exist.

We do not know the meaning of our lives at birth. We gain knowledge and wisdom from our interactions with people. Also from our actions and reactions to the situations we are in.

As we discover this meaning, there are certain beliefs and values that we reject and affirm. Our lives have purpose. This purpose puts all our physical, emotional, and intellectual potentials into use; sustains us during trying times; and gives us something to look forward to—a goal to achieve, a destination to reach.

A person without purpose or meaning is like a drifting ship at sea.

To grow spiritually is to recognize interconnections

Religions stress the concept of our relatedness to all creation, live and inanimate. Thus we call other people “brothers and sisters” even if there are no direct blood relations.

Moreover, deity-centered religions such as Christianity and Islam speak of the relationship between humans and a higher being. On the other hand, science expounds on our link to other living things through the evolution theory.

This relatedness is clearly seen in the concept of ecology, the interaction between living and non-living things. In psychology, connectedness is a characteristic of self-transcendence, the highest human need according to Maslow.

Recognizing your connection to all things makes you more humble and respectful of people, animals, plants, and things in nature. It makes you appreciate everything around you. This moves you to go beyond your comfort zone and reach out to other people. It become stewards of all other things around you.

 

Growth is a process thus to grow in spirit is a day-to-day encounter. We win some, we lose some, but the important thing is that we learn. From this knowledge, further spiritual growth is possible.

 

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Spiritual Growth: The Spiritual Challenge of Modern Times (Part 1 of 2)

Status today

Spiritual growth in a world defined by power, money, and influence is a Herculean task. Modern conveniences such as electronic equipment, gadgets, and tools as well as entertainment through television, magazines, and the web have predisposed us to confine our attention mostly to physical needs and wants.

As a result, our concepts of self-worth and self-meaning are muddled. How can we strike a balance between the material and spiritual aspects of our lives?

To grow spiritually is to look inward

Introspection goes beyond recalling the things that happened in a day, week, or month. You need to look closely and reflect on your thoughts, feelings, beliefs, and motivations.

Periodically examining your experiences, the decisions you make, the relationships you have, and the things you engage in provide useful insights on your life goals, on the good traits you must sustain and the bad traits you have to discard.

Moreover, it gives you clues on how to act, react, and conduct yourself in the midst of any situation. Like any skill, we can learn introspection; all it takes is the courage and willingness to seek the truths that lie within you.

Here are some pointers when you introspect

  1. be objective
  2. be forgiving of yourself, and
  3. focus on your areas for improvement.

To grow spiritually is to develop your potentials

Religion and science have differing views on matters of the human spirit. Religion views people as spiritual beings temporarily living on Earth. Science views the spirit as just one dimension of an individual.

Mastery of the self is a recurring theme in both Christian (Western) and Islamic (Eastern) teachings. The needs of the body are recognized but placed under the needs of the spirit. Beliefs, values, morality, rules, experiences, and good works provide the blueprint to ensure the growth of the spiritual being.

In Psychology, realizing one’s full potential is to self-actualize. Maslow identified several human needs: physiological, security, belongingness, esteem, cognitive, aesthetic, self-actualization, and self-transcendence.

James earlier categorized these needs into three: material, emotional, and spiritual. When you have satisfied the basic physiological and emotional needs, spiritual or existential needs come next.

Achieving each need leads to the total development of the individual. Perhaps the difference between these two religions and psychology is the end of self-development. Christianity and Islam see that self-development is a means toward serving God. Psychology view that self-development is an end by itself.

 

Continue reading the last part.

Instinct Develops With Age (Part 2 of 2)

Do not miss out the first part.

 

Continuation:

 

They find it much easier to see pros and cons visually. So when deciding which new car ‘wins’, write a time-limited brainstorm.

Setting yourself just 10 minutes of writing down the essential ‘fors’ and ’against’ will focus your mind and lead to a better decision.

Road-Test Your Rationale

With bigger decisions, like whether to buy a house that you love, has money-pit potential. It’s good to combine instinct with some nuts-and-bolts back-up .

This has big consequences and it’s likely to be something you’ve done too many times before. Because it’s unfamiliar, it’s likely your instinct won’t be a good guide.

If it feels like somewhere you’ll be happy, test out your intuition with a practical steps. It maybe drawing up a list of which features matter most to you. No matter whether it ticks enough most to you. Or it ticks enough practical as well as emotional.

The Two-Minute Face Saver

The snap decision we often get wrong is what kind of ‘advice’ to let tumble from our unzipped lips. So take the two-minute offence test.

A colleague presenting a flawed project, or a friend wearing a fright of an outfit. You will find it there’s a good test of whether it’s right to chime in with device .

If you feel your sentence should start with,’ I know I shouldn’t say this, but..’ then your gut is telling you to keep shut. So do.

Fake Complete Confidence

Knowing how to use your instincts at work means understanding the kind of person you are.

Are you letting worry get in the way? Optimists will just give something a go and assume it’ll be all right. Pessimists think being right is more important then the outcome.

We tend to think getting something absolutely right is more important than it really is. So in a meeting or when directing stuff, it’s often more important to simply take a decision and work with it than foster an atmosphere of uncertainty where no one can get on.

If you trust instincts, so will they.

 

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