The Power Of Acceptance

 

Inevitably in life we will have to face disappointment from time to time. Sometimes they may be little disappointments, and other times they may be great, big, heart wrenching disappointments. When this happens to us, we have a choice in how we react. Some of us may give up on our dreams, others may keep fighting stubbornly against the tide, and still others may choose another path to travel.

One important aspect of dealing with disappointment is acceptance. When we keep fighting against our circumstances and disappointments, it can leave us feeling frustrated, bitter and exhausted. Especially during those times in life when everything seems to keep going wrong for us, we get more and more stressed as we try to resist the undesirable circumstances.

Practicing acceptance can help ease that inner tension and allow us to see our situation more clearly. Accepting your circumstances does not mean giving up! It does not mean that you have to be 100% happy with your current situation. Acceptance means that you acknowledge and accept where you are in your life at this moment, even though it may not be ideal.

Maybe you hate your job or your marriage is faltering. Maybe you are struggling to lose weight and can’t seem to get anywhere with it. Whatever it is that is causing you stress, try accepting it instead of fighting against it. Repeat the following to yourself: “I may not be thrilled with the way things are in my life right now, but I accept it. I will do what I can and give the rest to God. I am thankful for the blessings I do have right now, and I know that more are on the way.”

It may take a lot of patience at the beginning, but as you continue to do this, something amazing happens. The struggles suddenly don’t seem so large anymore. They won’t magically dissolve before your eyes, but the edges seem to soften a bit. Life doesn’t seem quite so harsh anymore. Solutions to the problems may even begin to appear. If that doesn’t happen right away, that’s okay! Know that they will eventually. Just keep practicing acceptance and have faith that things will turn around.

I believe that everything happens for a reason. We are where we are in our lives right now because we are meant to be here. Several factors may have contributed to our current circumstances, such as choices we made in the past, or outside influences we have no control over. The questions to ask yourself are: What is the lesson here? What do I need to learn about this situation? Though you may not be happy with your current situation, there IS a reason you are there right now.

This is especially true if you continuously find yourself in similar situations! For example, if you keep choosing unhealthy relationships, you might want to take some time to discover why. If you are always struggling financially, there may be a message for you there. If you can’t seem to figure it out on your own, you might consider seeking professional help. Sometimes an outside party can see things that we can’t.

No matter what difficulties you are struggling with right now, know that this too shall pass. Difficulties do not last forever. Oftentimes, struggles are opportunities in disguise..

Advertisements

Joseph the Dreamer: Overcoming Life’s Challenges

 

Now Israel loved Joseph more than any of his other sons, because he had been born to him in his old age; and he made a richly ornamented robe for him. When his brothers saw that their father loved him more than any of them, they hated him and could not speak a kind word to him.

Of all the the bible characters I have come to love— one amazing man would have to be the first in line. His life was very interesting and continues to give valuable lessons that are still applicable in our modern times. His name was Joseph … the favorite son of Jacob… a man who had beautiful dreams … the object of sibling rivalry.

In the story, Joseph was always the center of his father’s love and attention. Jacob even gave Joseph a colorful coat or garment that came to symbolize how special he was in his father’s eyes. Later on, he would pay for his father’s foolish actions. Joseph’s brothers resented him because he was the favorite son. Jacob, the father, had two wives, two concubines, and twelve sons — all competing for his attention. Joseph’s family drama have all the makings of a t.v soap opera…with various episodes of jealousy, hatred, deception and self-interest. Reading the account of Joseph’s life is like being glued to the t.v screen full of anticipation about what will happen next.

Joseph, “the dreamer,” once told his brothers about a dream that a day would come when they would all bow down to him. This dream made his brothers grow more angry towards him. One day, Joseph was sent by his father on an errand. Specifically, Joseph was tasked to visit his brothers who were working in the field. Some accounts say that his brothers plotted to kill him but later decided to throw Joseph into a pit. Joseph’s brothers also took his colorful coat and wiped it with animal blood. They later lied to their father by saying that Joseph died after being attacked by wild animals. After some time at the bottom of the pit, Joseph was picked up by traveling merchants and later sold him into slavery.

The young lad was later sold by the merchants to Potiphar, one of the Egyptian Pharaoh’s trusted leaders. As a worker in Potiphar’s household, he became distinguished in his labors. He was later appointed supervisor over Potiphar’s household. The story takes a drastic turn when Potiphar’s wife falsely accused Joseph of attempting to sexually assault her. Of course, Potiphar’s wife did this to get back at Joseph who repeatedly warded off her sexual advances. Enraged by the accusation, Potiphar sent Joseph to prison.

In prison, Joseph again found favor by being able interpret the dreams of the Pharaoh. The Pharaoh was so full of stress and anxiety about the horrible dreams he had and the visions he could not understand. Through Joseph, the Pharaoh was able to understand the economic implications of his dreams for the land of Egypt. Later, he was appointed governor of Egypt. The famine that struck the land where Jacob and his sons lived became the reason why they were later reunited. Reconciliation between Joseph and his brothers paved the way for Jacob to again see his son.

This remarkable story shows how we, like Joseph, must cling to faith even in the most trying circumstances. Stress and anxiety need not stop us from believing that God has forsaken us and that we have been left alone in the middle of all our troubles. Indeed, overcoming life’s challenges is a journey of trust, faith, and perseverance that all of us must take. Like Joseph, we can also have great dreams and live up to our fullest potential.

Bill Gates and The Guy Who Could Have Been Him (Part 10 of 10)

Appreciate more the story, read the previous post:

Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6Part 7, Part 8, and Part 9.

 

By the end of 1980s, Digital Research had entered a death spiral and Kildall wave the white flag of surrender. He approached Gates and asked him to consider buying Digital Research for a fair price of $26 million. Gates rejected the offer and told Kildall the company might be worth only $10 million. A humbled Kildall had to look elsewhere to find a savior for his declining company.

Kildall’s hubris may be the culprit. Having fathered a revolution in personal computing, he assumed that all the other players would continue their childlike dependency on him. He thought that a dominant thing would always be dominant. Kildall was blind to how the delayed release of CP/M-86 had pushed IBM, Microsoft,and Seattle Computer Products to their breaking points.

He couldn’t imagine that all three companies might work around him to steal CP/M’s market. The irony is that the people at all three companies would have preferred to help Kildall and CP/M-86 succeed. Instead, they were forced to go to the extreme lengths of launching a competitor to CP/M-86, solely because Kildall left them no choice.

Kildall’s more fundamental mistake, however is he didn’t follow where the money is like Bill Gates. Kildall ridiculed IBM’s clumsy technology and overlooked its enormous market power, probably because technical subjects interested Kildall and marketing strategy didn’t.

Meanwhile, Bill Gates sets his priorities in exact opposite order. He was willing to hand IBM a shoddy product derived from other people’s work because what mattered most to Gates was that the mighty IBM get its project done on time.

Kildall, the innovator, followed his passion for technical excellence and was shocked at that IBM wouldn’t follow him. Gates, the imitator, took his cues from IBM every step of the way, because he believed that following IBM was the smartest way to follow where the money is. Gates guessed right, and became one of the richest in the world.

 

— end —

Bill Gates and The Guy Who Could Have Been Him (Part 9 of 10)

Appreciate more the story, read the previous post:

Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6Part 7, and Part 8.

 

When IBM’s programmers tried to run MS DOS on their prototype IBM PCs, they could hardly believe how buggy it was. By one count Microsoft had left at least 300 bugs in the software, and IBM eventually chose to rewrite the entire program. But Gates delivered on time, which kept the entire IBM PC project on schedule. The new IBM PC made its debut in August 1981, accompanied by a massive computer industry had never seen.

It took only a few years for Big Blue’s new desktop machines to take over the entire PC market. By 1983, two out of every three new home computers were made by IBM and were running the MS DOS operating system.

When Kildall got his first look at the IBM PC, he was enraged. He felt that MS DOS was nothing more than a crude clone of CP/M and that Gates stabbed him in the back. But he never sue IBM and Microsoft, partly because software copyrights were a hazy area of the law, but also he was so confident of CP/M-86’s superiority.

Once that CP/M-86 was ready for release in early 1982, Kildall was certain that most computer users would switch over from MS DOS. That’s not what happened. CP/M-86 did prove to be a better and more reliable operating system, but it was also more expensive.

Then IBM cautioned PC buyers that it would only offer technical support for computers running MS DOS. In no time at all, Microsoft displaced Digital Research as maker of the industry standard in operating systems. Software companies responded to IBM’s growing market dominance by pouring their resources into new applications for subsequent revisions of MS DOS. They also stopped bothering to upgrade their existing CP/M-compatible products.

 

Continue reading the last part here.

Loving

 

Our life is all about love.

God is love, and the most important lesson He wants us to learn is how to love. It is in loving that we are most like Him. Love is the foundation of every command He has given to us. The whole law summed up with these: Love God above else, and Love others as you love yourself.

Yet, learning to love unselfishly is not an easy task. It runs counter to our self-centered nature. That is why we are given a lifetime to learn it. God wants us to love everyone, but He is more particularly concerned that we learn to love others in his family.

That is one of the purpose of our lives. The apostle Peter tells us “show special love for God’s people”. Paul echoes this sentiment: “when we have the opportunity to help anyone, we should do it, but we should give special attention to those who are in the family of believers.”

God do insist that we give special love and attention to other believers. God wanted believers to get priority in loving, because God wants his family to be known for its love more than anything else.

Jesus said our love for each other, not our doctrinal beliefs, is our greatest witness to the world. He said “your strong love for each other will prove to the world that you are my disciples.”

In heaven we will enjoy God’s family forever, but first we have some tough work to do here on earth to prepare ourselves for an eternity of loving. God trains us by giving us “family responsibilities,” and the foremost of these is to practice loving each other.

God wants us to be in regular, close fellowship with other believers so we can develop the skill of loving. Love cannot be learned in isolation. You have to be around people, those irritating, imperfect, frustrating people.