Enjoy Your Life: Change Your Point of View (Part 1 of 2)

Enjoy your life

Change your point of view

Two men look out through the same bars: One sees the mud, and one sees the stars

Frederick Langbridge, A Cluster of Quiet Thoughts

Say you are only second placer in a writing contest. Will you jump for joy and push for better results the next time? Or will feel discourage and find an excuse not to join again?

Choices

In life, you are always facing with a lot of choices. You may opt to have a pessimist’s view and live a self-defeated life or you may decide to take the optimist’s route and take a challenging and fulfilling life.

So why nurture an optimist’s point of view? And why now?

The optimist

Well, optimism links to positive mood and good morale. To academic, athletic, military, occupational and political success and popularity; to good health and even to long life and freedom from trauma.

On the other hand, the rates of depression and pessimism have never been higher. It affects middle-aged adults the same way it hits younger people. The mean age of onset has gone from 30 to 15. It is no longer a middle-aged housewife’s disorder but also a teenager’s disorder’ as well.

Here’s how optimists are in action and researches that back up why it really pays to be an optimist:

Optimists expect the best

The defining characteristic of pessimists is that they tend to believe bad events, which will last a long time and undermine everything they do, are their own fault.

The truth is optimists are also confront with the same hard knocks of this world. What differs is the way they explain their misfortune—it’s the opposite way. They tend to believe defeat is just a temporary setback, that its causes are confine to this one case.

Optimists tend to focus on and plan for the ‘problem’ at hand. They use ‘positive reinterpretation.’ In other words, they most likely reinterpret a negative experience in a way that helps them learn and grow.

Such people are unfazed by bad situation, they perceive it is a challenge and try harder.

They won’t say “things will never get better,” “If I failed once, it will happen again” and “If I experience misfortune in one part of my life, then it will happen in my whole life.”

Positive expectancies of optimists also predict better reactions during transitions to new environments, sudden tragedies and unlikely turn of events. If they fall, they will stand up. They see opportunities instead of obstacles.

 

Continue reading:

Enjoy Your Life: Change Your Point of View (Part 2 of 2)

Advertisements

One thought on “Enjoy Your Life: Change Your Point of View (Part 1 of 2)

Comments are closed.