Uses and Abuses of Gut Instinct in Corporate World (Part 2 of 2)

Words of wisdom by Mr Jack Welch. Do not miss out and read the first part here.

 

More often than not, that means we should kill the deal, even if it annoys the so-called rational thinkers on the case. Odds are, they will give us a credit for farsighted thinking down the road (though probably with less public pleasure than you’d like).

By contrast, relying on our gut during hiring a personnel is not always a great idea. Because our gut often makes us fall in love with a candidate too quickly. We see a perfect resume with prestigious schools and great experience. We see a likable individual who says all the right things in the interview.

Even though we don’t admit it, too often we also see a person who can quickly make a problem go away, namely, a big, open, gaping position. So with our gut hurrying us along, we rush to seal the deal.

We see this dynamic action all the time when people call us for references. They start off by firmly stating that they only want an unvarnished view of the candidate in question, but as we start to give it to them, we can feel them begin to wither. Their voices tighten, it’s almost as if they are saying “oh please do not tell me that! All I really wanted from you was a stamp of approval!” They cannot get off the phone fast enough.

So when it comes to hiring decisions, we may want to ask our people to muster up the discipline to doubt and double-check their gut, and we should too. That means dig for extra data about the candidate. Make reference calls and make sure we force ourselves to listen especially to mixed messages and unpleasant insights.

Overall, gut calls to play a real role in the business, and a good one. Do not worry much about explaining that to our bosses and shareholders. They use theirs too.

 

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